Tag: dissertation writing service

XpowInfo

dissertation writing service

now browsing by tag

 
 

★Rubric for Multi Paragraph Essay

Teachers Pay Teachers
  • About Us
  • Gift Cards
  • Help
  • Schools

All Categories

    Grade Level

    • Pre-K – K
    • 1 – 2
    • 3 – 5
    • 6 – 8
    • 9 – 12
    • Other

    Subject

    • Arts & Music
    • English Language Arts
    • Foreign Language
    • Math
    • Science
    • Social Studies – History
    • Specialty
    • Holidays/Seasonal

    Price

    • Free
    • Under $5
    • $5 to $10
    • $10 and up
    • On Sale

    Resource Type

    • Lesson Plans
    • Activities
    • Exams/Quizzes
    • Worksheets
    • White Board Activities
    • PowerPoint
    • Novel Studies

Log In Join Us

Cart

    Cart is empty
Total:

$0.00
View Wish List View Cart

You Selected:

Keyword

multi paragraph essay

Grades

Other

CCSS

Math
ELA

Subjects

    Arts & Music

    • Art History
    • Cooking
    • Dance
    • Drama
    • Graphic Arts
    • Instrumental Music
    • Music
    • Music Composition
    • Other (Arts)
    • Other (Music)
    • Visual Arts
    • Vocal Music

    English Language Arts

    • Balanced Literacy
    • Close Reading
    • Creative Writing
    • EFL – ESL – ELD
    • ELA Test Prep
    • Grammar
    • Informational Text
    • Literature
    • Other (ELA)
    • Phonics
    • Poetry
    • Reading
    • Reading Strategies
    • Short Stories
    • Spelling
    • Vocabulary
    • Writing
    • Writing-Essays
    • Writing-Expository

    Foreign Language

    • American Sign Language
    • Arabic
    • Chinese
    • en Français
    • French
    • Gaeilge
    • German
    • Hebrew
    • Italian
    • Japanese
    • Latin
    • Other (World Language)
    • Portuguese
    • Russian
    • Spanish

    Holidays/Seasonal

    • Autumn
    • Back to School
    • Black History Month
    • Christmas/ Chanukah/ Kwanzaa
    • Earth Day
    • Easter
    • End of Year
    • Halloween
    • Martin Luther King Day
    • Presidents' Day
    • Spring
    • St. Patrick's Day
    • Summer
    • Thanksgiving
    • The New Year
    • Valentine's Day
    • Winter
    • Women's History Month

    Math

    • Algebra
    • Algebra 2
    • Applied Math
    • Arithmetic
    • Basic Operations
    • Calculus
    • Decimals
    • Fractions
    • Geometry
    • Graphing
    • Math Test Prep
    • Measurement
    • Mental Math
    • Numbers
    • Order of Operations
    • Other (Math)
    • Place Value
    • PreCalculus
    • Statistics
    • Trigonometry
    • Word Problems

    Science

    • Anatomy
    • Archaeology
    • Astronomy
    • Basic Principles
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • Earth Sciences
    • Engineering
    • Environment
    • Forensics
    • General Science
    • Other (Science)
    • Physical Science
    • Physics

    Social Studies – History

    • African History
    • Ancient History
    • Asian Studies
    • Australian History
    • British History
    • Canadian History
    • Civics
    • Criminal Justice – Law
    • Economics
    • Elections – Voting
    • European History
    • Geography
    • Government
    • Middle Ages
    • Native Americans
    • Other (Social Studies – History)
    • Psychology
    • U.S. History
    • World History

    Specialty

    • Business
    • Career and Technical Education
    • Character Education
    • Child Care
    • Classroom Community
    • Classroom Management
    • Coaching
    • Computer Science – Technology
    • Critical Thinking
    • Early Intervention
    • Family Consumer Sciences
    • For Administrators
    • For All Subjects
    • Gifted and Talented
    • Handwriting
    • Health
    • Instructional Technology
    • International Baccalaureate
    • Library Skills
    • Life Skills
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Oral Communication
    • Other (Specialty)
    • Physical Education
    • Physical Therapy
    • Problem Solving
    • Products For TpT Sellers
    • Professional Development
    • Religion
    • Robotics
    • School Counseling
    • School Psychology
    • Special Education
    • Speech Therapy
    • Student Council
    • Study Skills
    • Test Preparation
    • Tools for Common Core
    • Vocational Education
  • For All Subject Areas

Prices

  • Free
  • Under $5
  • $5 – $10
  • $10 and up
  • On Sale

Resource Types

  • Assessment
  • Google Apps
  • Unit Plans
  • Interactive Notebooks
  • Math Centers
  • Games
  • Novel Study
  • See All Resource Types

    • Videos
    • Activities
    • Assessment
    • Bibliographies
    • Bulletin Board Ideas
    • By TpT Sellers for TpT Sellers
    • Classroom Forms
    • Cooperative Learning
    • Cultural Activities
    • DBQs
    • Examinations – Quizzes
    • Flash Cards
    • Fun Stuff
    • GATE
    • Google Apps
    • Grant Proposals
    • Graphic Organizers
    • Handouts
    • Homeschool Curricula
    • Homework
    • Interactive Notebooks
    • Interactive Whiteboard
    • Internet Activities
    • Lectures
    • Lesson Plans (Bundled)
    • Lesson Plans (Individual)
    • Literacy Center Ideas
    • Literature Circles
    • Microsoft OneDrive
    • Mini-Course
    • Minilessons
    • Mnemonics
    • Movie Guides
    • Multimedia
    • Nonfiction Book Study
    • Novel Study
    • Other
    • Outlines
    • Posters
    • PowerPoint Presentations
    • Printables
    • Projects
    • Research
    • Rubrics
    • Scaffolded Notes
    • Study Guides
    • Syllabi
    • Task Cards
    • Teacher Manuals
    • Test Prep
    • Thematic Unit Plans
    • Unit Plans
    • Whole Courses
    • Word Walls
    • Workbooks
    • Worksheets

Relevance

  • Relevance
  • Best Seller
  • Rating
  • Price (Ascending)
  • Price (Descending)
  • Most Recent

showing 1 – 24 of 280 results

Test Prep: Writing a Multi Paragraph Essay (aligned to the AIR test)

Test Prep: Writing a Multi Paragraph Essay (aligned to the AIR test)
avatar

by

JB Creations
Provide students with a strategy for writing a multi-paragraph essay on the AIR state test! This resource is PACKED with all you need to walk students through a modeled essay writing lesson from start to finish with detailed teaching slides, tips, and strategies. Students will learn how to generat
Subjects:
ELA Test Prep , Writing , Writing-Essays
Grades:
3rd , 4th , 5th
Types:
Test Prep , Minilessons , Printables
CCSS:
RI.3.9 , RI.4.9 , RI.5.9 , W.3.1 , W.3.2 , W.3.4 , W.4.1 , W.4.2 , W.4.4 , W.5.1
$12.50
50 Ratings

4.0

Digital Download

ZIP ( 19.22 MB )

Wish List
Multi-Paragraph Essay Worksheet for Low Level Writers

Multi-Paragraph Essay Worksheet for Low Level Writers
avatar

by

Speary
This worksheet explains briefly what the different parts of an essay are (Thesis Statement, Hook, Concrete Details, Commentary…). The second part of the worksheet is for the students to use when writing their essays. The worksheet tells them what to put into each section of the essay sentence by
Subjects:
English Language Arts , Writing-Expository
Grades:
7th , 8th , 9th , 10th , 11th , 12th
Types:
Worksheets , Handouts
$2.00
$1.00
8 Ratings

4.0

Digital Download

DOC ( 25.5 KB )

Wish List
Writing Handout: The Multi-Paragraph Essay and Thesis Statements

Writing Handout: The Multi-Paragraph Essay and Thesis Statements
avatar

by

The Sentence Teacher
This is a two-page writing handout that focuses on:

1. The basic multi-paragraph essay structure (introduction, body, conclusion)
2. Essay writing terminology (hook, topic sentence, clincher, etc.)
3. What a thesis statement is NOT
4. Qualities of an effective thesis statement

This handout can be

Subjects:
English Language Arts , Writing
Grades:
6th , 7th , 8th , 9th
Types:
Handouts
$7.99
7 Ratings

4.0

Digital Download

PDF ( 133.36 KB )

Wish List
Multi Paragraph Essay Writing Format with Visual Support

Multi Paragraph Essay Writing Format with Visual Support
avatar

by

A Fresh Breath
Writing a multi-paragraph essay can be difficult for students to do. This format gives students support in writing an essay that contains an introduction paragraph, 3 supporting paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph. This format is simple to use, giving students a label and space to put each type o
Subjects:
English Language Arts , Writing , Writing-Essays
Grades:
4th , 5th , 6th , 7th , 8th
Types:
Handouts , Printables , Graphic Organizers
$1.00
1 Rating

4.0

Digital Download

PDF ( 248.81 KB )

Wish List
To Kill A Mockingbird: Write A Multi-Paragraph Essay on Two Themes

To Kill A Mockingbird: Write A Multi-Paragraph Essay on Two Themes
avatar

by

Bullseye Education
This document contains one prompt for the production of a multi-paragraph essay related to a student’s choice of two themes from the novel. This prompt can be used for an in-class assignment or be modified for take-home use.

Below are instructions for writing a multi-paragraph essay.

Your task fo

Subjects:
English Language Arts , Literature , Writing-Essays
Grades:
9th , 10th , 11th , 12th , Higher Education , Adult Education , Homeschool
Types:
Lesson Plans (Individual) , Activities , Novel Study
$2.00
not yet rated

N/A

Digital Download

DOC ( 27 KB )

Wish List
Multi-paragraph Essay “Herculean Tasks”

Multi-paragraph Essay “Herculean Tasks”
avatar

by

Days of Yore
This assignment provides the students an opportunity to write a multi-paragraph essay in Social Studies in which they use text evidence to support their ideas. Attached are a grid with instructions to write a 4 paragraph essay along with text evidence article about the labors of Hercules.
Subjects:
World History , Writing-Essays
Grades:
7th , 8th , 9th , 10th , 11th , Homeschool
Types:
Activities , Handouts , Graphic Organizers
$5.00
not yet rated

N/A

Digital Download

DOCX ( 260.4 KB )

Wish List
Multi Paragraph Essay Graphic Organizer

Multi Paragraph Essay Graphic Organizer
avatar

by

LCMJ LCMJ
Multi Paragraph Essay (Third Grade Experience)
Subjects:
Writing-Expository , Writing , Writing-Essays
Grades:
3rd , 4th , 5th
Types:
Graphic Organizers
$2.00
1 Rating

4.0

Digital Download

DOCX ( 14.67 KB )

Wish List
Multi Paragraph Essay Graphic Organizer

Multi Paragraph Essay Graphic Organizer
avatar

by

LCMJ LCMJ
Multi Paragraph Essay/Report (on the Writing Process)
Subjects:
Writing-Expository , Writing , Writing-Essays
Grades:
3rd , 4th , 5th
Types:
Graphic Organizers
$2.00
not yet rated

N/A

Digital Download

DOCX ( 15.78 KB )

Wish List
Five 5 Paragraph Essay Organizer and Outline

Five 5 Paragraph Essay Organizer and Outline
avatar

by

Amanda Rick
This is a printable two-part graphic organizer for the standard five paragraph essay. It can be used for a basic topic, an essay on a novel or nonfiction text, an opinion or persuasive essay, etc.

Parents and students have raved to me about the ease of this layout and format – a helpful transition

Subjects:
Writing-Expository , Writing , Writing-Essays
Grades:
3rd , 4th , 5th , 6th , 7th , 8th , 9th , 10th , 11th , 12th , Homeschool
Types:
Minilessons , Printables , Graphic Organizers
$3.00
13 Ratings

3.9

Digital Download

PDF ( 355.37 KB )

Wish List
Web Cluster and Prewriting PowerPoint: THE 5-PARAGRAPH ESSAY Planning

Web Cluster and Prewriting PowerPoint: THE 5-PARAGRAPH ESSAY Planning
avatar

by

PowerPoint Guru
This PowerPoint helps student with the entire scope of a 5-paragraph response. The main focus of the PowerPoint, however, is a building an outline and using a web cluster. The theme of the PowerPoint is connected to Spiderman's webs to build engagement with students whom you might traditionally ha
Subjects:
English Language Arts , Writing-Expository , ELA Test Prep
Grades:
4th , 5th , 6th , 7th , 8th , 9th , 10th , 11th , 12th , Higher Education , Adult Education , Homeschool
Types:
Lectures , PowerPoint Presentations , Fun Stuff

Also included in:  Freshman English: A Semester

$3.00
$2.75
43 Ratings

3.9

Digital Download

PPT ( 9.95 MB )

Wish List
Personal Narrative Writing Process - Multi Paragraph

Personal Narrative Writing Process – Multi Paragraph
avatar

by

Becky Brumm
Modeled after the Write From the Beginning writing process, this presentation walks writers through the process of creating a multi-paragraph writing piece STEP-BY-STEP! Starting off with a Circle Map, transferring ideas onto a Flow Map, Revising throughout, and Composing a Rough Draft. The Notebook
Subjects:
English Language Arts , Writing , Writing-Essays
Grades:
3rd , 4th , 5th , 6th , 7th , 8th
Types:
Interactive Whiteboard
$4.00
$3.00
4 Ratings

3.9

Digital Download

NOTEBOOK ( 296.14 KB )

Wish List
Multi-paragraph Graphic Organizer

Multi-paragraph Graphic Organizer
avatar

by

Markers and Minions
This is a basic graphic organizer to help your students organize their writing into five paragraphs. There are three versions.
– The first version has each box labeled: introduction, body paragraph 1, body paragraph 2, body paragraph 3, and closing.
– The second version has each box labeled: intro
Subjects:
Writing , Writing-Essays
Grades:
3rd , 4th , 5th , 6th
Types:
Graphic Organizers
$1.00
23 Ratings

4.0

Digital Download

PDF ( 324.89 KB )

Wish List
A Tree Is Growing by Arthur Dorros: Multi-Paragraph Expository Writing Lesson

A Tree Is Growing by Arthur Dorros: Multi-Paragraph Expository Writing Lesson
avatar

by

For The Birds In Third
This is a guided writing lesson for multi-paragraph expository writing connected to text. After reading A Tree is Growing, students sort and categorize pre-written details on a large piece of construction paper. In a subsequent lesson, students use their organized details to compose a five paragra
Subjects:
English Language Arts , Writing-Expository , Informational Text
Grades:
3rd
Types:
Lesson Plans (Individual) , Graphic Organizers
$1.00
8 Ratings

4.0

Digital Download

ZIP ( 12.59 MB )

Wish List
Multi-paragraph Writing Made Easy

Multi-paragraph Writing Made Easy
avatar

by

Alisha Adkins
If your students can write a single paragraph, they can write a multi-paragraph essay. This 12 page mini-unit guides students through the writing process while demonstrating how to expand a paragraph into a full essay.
This material follows the "I do- we do – you do" model and scaffolds student wri
Subjects:
English Language Arts , Writing , Writing-Essays
Grades:
6th , 7th , 8th , 9th , 10th
Types:
Lesson Plans (Individual) , Activities , Printables
$4.99
2 Ratings

3.7

Digital Download

DOC ( 58.5 KB )

Wish List
Student Friendly Multi-Paragraph Response Rubric

Student Friendly Multi-Paragraph Response Rubric
avatar

by

K Zutali
Based on rubrics used to score AIR multi-paragraph responses at the 6th, 7th, and 8th grade levels, the rubric centers around three areas: purpose, focus, organization; evidence, elaboration; and conventions. Wording for each area of the rubric has been reduced to its simplest and most concrete form
Subjects:
Writing-Expository , ELA Test Prep , Writing-Essays
Grades:
6th , 7th , 8th
Types:
Worksheets , Printables , Rubrics
$1.00
2 Ratings

4.0

Digital Download

PDF ( 748.37 KB )

Wish List
Writing Rubrics for Simple Sentence, Single Paragraph, and Multi-Paragraph

Writing Rubrics for Simple Sentence, Single Paragraph, and Multi-Paragraph
avatar

by

Dominique – ABC's and IEP's
Included are 3 separate rubrics you can easily use to monitor your students writing!

LEVEL ONE: Single Sentence
LEVEL TWO: Single Paragraph
LEVEL THREE: Multi-Paragraph Essay

Use these for IEP goal progress, grading, OR both!

You can use this in the special education classroom or general educat

Subjects:
English Language Arts , Special Education , Writing
Grades:
Not Grade Specific
Types:
Handouts , Assessment , Rubrics
$1.00
1 Rating

4.0

Digital Download

PDF ( 43.9 KB )

Wish List
Journal Prompt Multi Paragraph Graphic Organizer

Journal Prompt Multi Paragraph Graphic Organizer
avatar

by

Katie Reeves
This graphic organizer works well for higher level students that understand how to write a paragraph. It allows the students to choose topic sentences, one per paragraph, and 4 details to go with each. I taught my students how to use this graphic organizer by modeling it for them once. Some students
Subjects:
Writing , Writing-Essays
Grades:
4th , 5th , 6th , 7th
Types:
Graphic Organizers
$1.00
1 Rating

4.0

Digital Download

PDF ( 87.29 KB )

Wish List
Analytical Five-Paragraph Essay : 13 Smart Notebook Files. OVER 100 SLIDES! #ed

Analytical Five-Paragraph Essay : 13 Smart Notebook Files. OVER 100 SLIDES! #ed
avatar

by

GeekedOutTeacher
Don't have SMART Notebook? These files can be opened with SMART Notebook Express http://express.smarttech.com/#

This bundle includes the following 13 Smart Notebook presentations to help walk your students through the writing process for a five paragraph essay:

Writing the Thesis Statement
Writin

Subjects:
English Language Arts , Writing , Writing-Essays
Grades:
8th , 9th , 10th , 11th , 12th
Types:
Lectures , Lesson Plans (Bundled) , Interactive Whiteboard
$20.00
$10.00
not yet rated

N/A

Digital Download

ZIP ( 1.95 MB )

Wish List
Romeo and Juliet One Paragraph Essay Test

Romeo and Juliet One Paragraph Essay Test
avatar

by

Carpe Librum
This is the essay test I use at the end of my Romeo and Juliet unit. My students choose two of the five topics to write a one paragraph, literary analysis essay over (these guidelines can be adapted at the teacher's discretion: one topic can be made into a multi-paragraph essay, for example).

The

Subjects:
English Language Arts , Literature , Writing-Essays
Grades:
8th , 9th , 10th , 11th , 12th
Types:
Assessment
$1.99
not yet rated

N/A

Digital Download

PDF ( 121.92 KB )

Wish List
Paragraph Writing Practice

Paragraph Writing Practice
avatar

by

The Owl Teacher
Common Core wants students to write multiple paragraphs but before they can do that, they need to be able to write just one paragraph. This resource scaffolds your students through everything they need to start writing a paragraph! See the preview for details!This resource begins with your students
Subjects:
English Language Arts , Writing , Tools for Common Core
Grades:
2nd , 3rd , 4th , 5th
Types:
Activities , Test Prep , Printables
$3.25
79 Ratings

4.0

Digital Download

PDF ( 19.08 MB )

Wish List
The Three Little Pigs vs. Mr. A. Wolf (Opinion Writing Unit)

The Three Little Pigs vs. Mr. A. Wolf (Opinion Writing Unit)
avatar

by

Markers and Minions
In this three-week long writing unit, students will formulate an argument and effectively use evidence to support their reasoning. This experience gives them the opportunity to practice these important skills using familiar and entertaining texts.

Your students will learn to:
– take a writing piece

Subjects:
Reading , Writing-Essays , Close Reading
Grades:
3rd , 4th , 5th
Types:
Projects , Lesson Plans (Bundled) , Thematic Unit Plans
CCSS:
W.3.1a , W.3.1b , W.3.1c , W.3.1d

Also included in:  All PBL, Research, and Writing Units! (Benchmark Advance)

$10.00
32 Ratings

4.0

Digital Download

PDF ( 4.59 MB )

Wish List
Writing with the Hamburger Model

Writing with the Hamburger Model
avatar

by

Deb Hanson
Writing with the Hamburger Model PowerPoint: This resource contains a 40-slide PowerPoint plus handouts. The first half of the PowerPoint focuses on how to use a hamburger planner to write a well-organized paragraph. The second half of the PowerPoint focuses on how to write a multiple paragraph essa
Subjects:
English Language Arts , ELA Test Prep , Writing
Grades:
2nd , 3rd , 4th , Homeschool
Types:
PowerPoint Presentations , Activities , Minilessons
CCSS:
CCRA.W.2
$4.00
173 Ratings

4.0

Digital Download

ZIP ( 9.5 MB )

Wish List
Basic Five-Paragraph Essay Kit

Basic Five-Paragraph Essay Kit
avatar

by

Leo's Lit Parlor – Equipping ELA Excellence
Greetings!

If you’ve ever wanted an easy way to teach students how to write a simple five-paragraph essay, this kit is for you!

Students struggle mightily when structuring their arguments, and this package keeps things simple for students of ALL ages. For just $20, you can provide a framework to

Subjects:
English Language Arts , Writing-Expository , Writing-Essays
Grades:
9th , 10th , 11th , 12th
Types:
Activities , Assessment , Classroom Forms
CCSS:
CCRA.W.1 , CCRA.W.4 , CCRA.W.5
$20.00
not yet rated

N/A

Digital Download

ZIP ( 160.03 KB )

Wish List
My Brother Sam is Dead CER Multi-Paragraph- Chapter 5

My Brother Sam is Dead CER Multi-Paragraph- Chapter 5
avatar

by

Alexa Nemeth
CER writing format for Chapter 5 of my My Brother Sam is Dead novel for a multi paragraph essay.
Subjects:
Special Education , Writing
Grades:
4th , 5th , 6th
Types:
Worksheets
$1.50
not yet rated

N/A

Digital Download

PDF ( 220.92 KB )

Wish List

showing 1 – 24 of 280 results

Teachers Pay Teachers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

Learn More

About

  • Who We Are
  • We're Hiring
  • Press
  • Blog

Support

  • Help & FAQ
  • Contact Us
  • Terms of Service
  • Trademark & Copyright
  • Privacy Policy

Keep in Touch!

Are you getting the free resources, updates, and special offers we send out every week in our teacher newsletter?

Sign Up

Create Explore Learn & support
Get started
Log in
Pricing
Get started

Log in My Prezis Explore Learn & support

Product Company Careers Support Community Contact Apps
English Español 한국어 日本語 Deutsch Português Français Magyar Italiano

Houston, we have a problem!

Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

Loading presentation…

Public

& reusable

Create your own

Make a copy

Share

Embed

Liked

Like

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

Delete Cancel

Multi-Paragraph Essay Review

No description

by

Waianae English

on 29 October 2013

Tweet

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Multi-Paragraph Essay Review

Multi-Paragraph Essay Review
Step 1: The Introduction
A basic introduction contains three sentences. They are called the hook, background information, and the thesis.
The Thesis
The thesis can be written as a formula:
[Topic + verb + opinion] + "because" + List (subtopic 1 + subtopic 2 + subtopic 3)
Step 2: Body Paragraphs
Body paragraphs follow the "Write Tools" outline. You know:
1) Topic Sentence
2) Big idea
3) Tell me more (detail)
4) Tell me more (detail)
5) repeat steps 2-4
6) repeat steps 2-4
7) conclusion/transition
Step 3: Conclusion
A basic conclusion has two sentences:
1) Synthesized thesis
2) "So what?" or "What’s next?"
Step 4: Draft, Peer review, revise, and publish
This last step is just a continuation of the writing cycle.
topic+verb+opinion
This is called the claim. Its job in the thesis is to explain "what" a paper will talk about or explain.
"because"+list
This part of a thesis is called the plan. Its job is to tell the reader "how" a paper will explain the claim.
Synthesized Thesis
A synthesized thesis contains the main points from each of your body paragraphs. Basically, you are substituting the general statements of the list with details from your body paragraphs.
"So what?" Game
After reading your new synthesized thesis, ask yourself the question, "so what?" The answer to the question is your next sentence. You can also ask:
1) What’s next?
2) Who should care?
3) why is this important?

Full transcript

More presentations by

Waianae English

  • Title by Name

    Title by Name

  • Untitled Prezi

    Untitled Prezi

  • The Science of Star Trek

    The Science of Star Trek

More prezis by author

Popular presentations

    See more popular or the latest prezis

    • Prezi

    • Product
    • Gallery
    • The Science
    • Conversational Presenting
    • For Business
    • Testimonials
    • Company

    • About
    • Team
    • Careers
    • Our Values
    • Press
    • Our Customers
    • Company Information
    • Contact Us
    • Languages

    • English
    • Español
    • 한국어
    • 日本語
    • Deutsch
    • Português
    • Français
    • Magyar
    • Italiano
    • Infogram
    • Charts
    • Infographics
    • Support

    • Prezi Next Support
    • Prezi Classic Support
    • Blog

    • Latest posts

    © 2018 Prezi Inc.
    Terms & Privacy Policy

    Prezi

    • Product
    • Gallery
    • The Science
    • Conversational Presenting
    • For Business
    • Testimonials

    Infogram

    • Infogram
    • Charts
    • Infographics

    Company

    • About
    • Team
    • Careers
    • Our Values
    • Press
    • Our Customers
    • Company Information
    • Contact Us

    Support

    • Prezi Next Support
    • Prezi Classic Support

    Languages

    • English
    • Español
    • 한국어
    • 日本語
    • Deutsch
    • Português
    • Français
    • Magyar
    • Italiano

    © 2018 Prezi Inc.
    Terms & Privacy Policy

    SlidePlayer

    Upload



    • My presentations
    • Profile
    • Feedback
    • Log out

    Log in

    Download presentation

    Presentation is loading. Please wait.

    Presentation is loading. Please wait.

    • Video
    • Slideshow




    Writing a Multi-Paragraph Essay

    Published by Mavis McCoy
    Modified over 3 years ago




    Similar presentations


    Presentation on theme: “Writing a Multi-Paragraph Essay”— Presentation transcript:

    1

    Writing a Multi-Paragraph Essay
    Introduction: Ideas should go from general to specific. Paragraph should be four to five sentences including thesis statement.


    2

    Writing an Introduction
    Begin with something to catch the reader’s attention, i.e. “feeling” or “emotional” words or a question/ anecdote / interesting or provocative statement / famous quotation, etc.


    3

    Writing an Introduction
    Thesis Statement: Thesis=Answer to prompt + your opinion Must include the author & title of the book. Thesis shows your opinion about an arguable topic. Thesis should go at the end of the paragraph.


    4

    Example Introduction:
    Jealousy is a powerful emotion that can lead to horrible circumstances. Sometimes, people are not even aware of what they are doing when they are doing it, but their emotions take over and make them do terrible things. In Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, jealousy and revenge take hold of young Abigail Williams causing her to wreak havoc on an entire town. Ultimately, it is Abigail’s actions that result in the witch trials and the killing of many innocent people.


    5

    Concluding Sentence (CS)
    Terms to Know Topic Sentence (TS) This sentence is the first sentence in your paragraph and lets the reader know what the main focus of the paragraph will be. Concluding Sentence (CS) – This is the last sentence in your paragraph. Sums it up and ties back to the thesis (As a result,…)


    6

    Terms to Know Concrete Detail (CD)
    This is the stuff from the literature – it’s the evidence for your commentary! Plot References/Paraphrasing facts, examples from story (what happened). Direct Quote- (DQ) Include citation Use the 4-step quote method.


    7

    Terms to Know Commentary (CM) This is the stuff from inside your head!
    This is the answer to “so what?” Your words and explanations. May be referred to as: analysis, interpreting, opinion, inference, insight, reasons, elaboration.


    8

    Writing Body Paragraphs
    Sent. #1 -Topic Sentence – TS Sent. #2 – CD –starts with “For example” Sent. #3 – DQ- From the text, must be cited. Sent. #4 – 2 CM – (It also indicates…; This is because…; This is important because…This shows that) Sent, #5 – Concluding Sentence – CS – Sums it up and ties back to the thesis (As a result,…)


    9

    Example of Body Paragraph
    In Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Harry is a champion to many of the more insecure students at Hogwarts. For example, when Malfoy takes Neville’s Rememberall, Harry gets on a broom and gets it back. He simply cannot stand someone who picks on others. Because of this, Harry becomes a hero to those less fortunate. In other words, he has found a place where he belongs, and he becomes determined to protect the vulnerable people he has grown fond of.


    10

    Writing a Conclusion Like Intro., just three to five sentences
    All CM; no CD Do NOT repeat your thesis statement or introductory paragraph, RESTATE it using different words. Reflect what your essay said & provide closure, moving this time from specific to general. Try to relate your thesis to the world at large. Do NOT add any new information!


    11

    Quotation Verbs  When introducing a quotation, choose a verb that best reflects what you want to say with the material you have chosen to quote. The following is a list of alternatives to the word states: demonstrates objects adds defends maintains argues assumes


    12

    Quotation Verbs disputes remarks challenges establishes shows claims
    specifies compares feels contrasts concludes illustrates suggests stresses contends introduces questions justifies presents believes


    13

    Transition Words To improve your writing you need to make sure that your ideas, both in sentences and paragraphs, stick together or have coherence and that the gap between ideas is bridged smoothly. One way to do this is by using transitions – words or phrases or techniques that help bring two ideas together. Transitional words and phrases represent one way of gaining coherence.


    14

    Transition Words Certain words help continue an idea, indicate a shift of thought or contrast, or sum up a conclusion. Check the following list of words to find those that will pull your sentences and paragraphs together.


    15

    Transition Words For continuing a common line of reasoning:
    consequently clearly, then furthermore additionally and in addition moreover in the same way following this further also pursuing this further in the light of the… it is because besides that easy to see that


    16

    Transition Words To change the line of reasoning (contrast):
    however on the other hand but yet nevertheless on the contrary


    17

    Transition Words For opening a paragraph initially or for general use: admittedly assuredly certainly granted no doubt nobody denies obviously of course undoubtedly unquestionably generally speaking in general to be sure at this level in this situation


    18

    Transition Words To restate a point within a paragraph in another way or in a more exacting way: in other words point in fact specifically


    19

    Transition Words Transitional chains, to use in separating sections of a paragraph which is arranged chronologically: first… second… third… generally… furthermore… finally in the first place… also… lastly in the first place… pursuing this further… finally to be sure… additionally… lastly basically… similarly… as well


    20

    Transition Words To signal conclusion in a paragraph or the entire essay: Therefore Hence In final analysis In conclusion Lastly Finally


    21

    A Few More Tips! Do not use first person.
    State your position and then defend it with support. Describe plot elements using present tense. Avoid informal, conversational expressions that are, u know, like, well, so, lol, idk, etc.



    Download ppt “Writing a Multi-Paragraph Essay”

    Similar presentations


    Presentation is loading. Please wait….

    OK


    HOW TO WRITE AN EFFECTIVE ANALYSIS PARAGRAPH WITH HARRY POTTER!

    About project

    SlidePlayer
    Terms of Service

    Feedback

    Privacy Policy
    Feedback

    © 2018 SlidePlayer.com Inc.
    All rights reserved.

    To make this website work, we log user data and share it with processors. To use this website, you must agree to our Privacy Policy , including cookie policy.
        
    Ads by Google

    ★Best Cover Letter Tips For 2015

    Skip to main content

    1. Advice
    2. Cover Letters & Resumes
    3. Cover Letter Samples

    Sample cover letter for a marketing manager

    The best way to market yourself is with a top notch cover letter.

    Kim Isaacs, Monster Resume Expert

    Sample cover letter for a marketing manager

    Use your marketing skills on your best client: you.

    Are you an ace when it comes to marketing products and services, but stuck when promoting yourself for marketing manager jobs? To be considered for top marketing manager jobs, it helps to have a cover letter that demonstrates your skills as well as the value you’d bring to the company.

    For cover letter writing tips, view this sample cover letter for a marketing manager below. 

    Additionally, you can learn more about marketing careers and search for  marketing manager jobs  on Monster.

     

     

    Marketing manager cover letter template

     
     
    MARIE JONES 
    15 Park Way
    Sometown, CA 55555
    Home: 555-555-5555 | Cell: 444-444-4444
    [email protected]
    Available to Relocate
     

     

    [Date]

    Ms. Janet Ramos
    VP Marketing
    XYZ Company
    1515 Market St.
    Sometown, CA 55555

    Re: Marketing manager position advertised on Monster.com

    Dear Ms. Ramos:

    I read your advertisement for a marketing manager with great interest. If you are seeking to augment your leadership team with an experienced and accomplished marketing professional known for breakthrough results, please consider my enclosed resume.

    As JKL Company’s marketing manager since 2015, I direct all phases of both the creative and technical elements of marketing initiatives including data mining, brand creation, print/Web collateral development, lead generation, channel partner cultivation, customer segmentation/profiling, as well as CRM and acquisition strategies.

    Perhaps most importantly, I offer a history of proven results, as evidenced by the following marketing accomplishments for my current employer:

     

    • Captured a 28% expansion in customer base since 2015, achieved during a period of overall decline in the retail industry.
    • Led national marketing campaign (comprised of trade show, media and PR initiatives) of company’s newly launched technology services division.
    • Developed and executed SEO strategy that achieved and sustained top 3 rankings on Google and Bing (organic, nonpaid results) for key product search terms.
    • Oversaw creation of new company logo and rebranded 100+ products to cement a cohesive corporate identity and support new company direction.

    Given the opportunity, I’m confident in my ability to achieve similar groundbreaking marketing results for XYZ Company.

    Ms. Ramos, I would welcome the chance to discuss your marketing objectives and ways I can help you attain them. Feel free to call me at 555-555-5555 to arrange a meeting. I look forward to speaking with you.

    Sincerely,

    Marie Jones
    Enclosure: Resume

     

    Selling your skills

    Knowing how to position yourself for a job is difficult, even for a marketing professional. Once your cover letter is in good shape, it’s time to work on your resume. You want to highlight your skills, experience, and demonstrate that you’d be the perfect fit for the company. Oh, and presentation does indeed matter. Could you use some help fine-tuning your resume? Get a free resume evaluation today from the experts at  Monster’s Resume Writing Service . You’ll get detailed feedback in two business days, including a review of your resume’s appearance and content, and a prediction of a recruiter’s first impression. Consider your resume a personal piece of marketing to help promote your skills to hiring managers. 

    Related Articles


      Comments

      By commenting, you agree to Monster’s privacy policy , terms of use and use of cookies.

      Most Recent Marketing Manager Jobs

      Content Marketing Manager – Content Marketing, SaaS, B2B

      CyberCoders

      San Francisco, CA, 94102

      Marketing Project Manager (Medicare Marketing) – Thousand Oaks, CA – PS3200

      Anthem

      Thousand Oaks, CA

      Marketing Manager (Siebel Marketing Campaign Experience Required) – PS1055

      Anthem

      Indianapolis, IN

      Marketing Manager, Investor Marketing

      E-TRADE

      New York, NY

      Digital Marketing Program Manager, Global Marketing

      Honeywell

      Morris Plains, NJ

      See More Marketing Manager Jobs

      Back to top

      Find a Job You’ll Love

      Thank you!
      You are now a Monster member—and you’ll receive more content in your inbox soon.

      Your perfect match is out there!
      Join Monster to get job alerts and essential job-search advice.



      Warning goes here.

      By continuing, you agree to Monster’s privacy policy , terms of use and use of cookies .



      You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

      Free Career Advice

      • Career Advice

        • Getting Started
        • Getting Ahead
        • Work Relationships
        • Changing Jobs
        • Work-Life Balance
        • Working Abroad
        • Career Videos
      • Job Search

        • Finding a Job
        • Resumes & Cover Letters
        • Interviewing for a Job
        • Networking
        • Jobs of the Week
        • Job Search Videos
      • Career Paths

        • Finding Your Passion
        • Exploring Career Paths
        • Career Changes
        • Grad School
      • Management

        • Hiring
        • Conflict Resolution
        • Management Style
        • Team Culture
      • Tools & Skills

        • Productivity
        • Business Travel
        • Tech Skills
        • Communication
        • Social Media & Blogging
        • Negotiation & Money
      • Breakroom

        • Trending Topics
        • Book Reviews
        • Lifestyle
        • Time Wasters
      • More

        • Management
        • Tools & Skills
        • Breakroom
      • Career Advice
      • Job Search
      • More

        • Career Paths
        • Management
        • Tools & Skills
        • Breakroom
      Resumes & Cover Letters

      Cover Letters Are Hard to Write—But This Template Makes it a Breeze

      by

      Aja Frost

      Cover Letter Template

      “Thanks for helping me customize my resume ,” my friend said cheerily. “Now I just have to find the cover letter I used for my last job application and spruce it up a little.”

      “Nooooooo!” I said. “There’s no point in taking all that time to tailor your resume to each application if you’re going to use a fill-in-the-blank cover letter.”

      We ended up sitting together for another 30 minutes and coming up with a new one that highlighted what a great fit she was—not just for the role, but for the company. And while a half hour is a time investment, it’s absolutely worth it if it gets you the job. (Which my friend did.)

      Wondering how to customize your own cover letter ? Check out the cover letter template below.

      In Your Salutation

      Most job seekers already know this, but just in case: You should always address your cover letter to a specific person . It shows you’re willing to do your research. Plus, seeing “Dear John Doe” will impress the person reading it (even if he or she is not John Doe) much more than “To whom it may concern” will.

      If the job posting doesn’t include a name, look up the company’s hiring manager. No luck? Search for the person in charge of the department to which you’re applying. If you’re still striking out, try these advanced techniques .

      In Your Opening Paragraph

      The first section of your cover letter is the perfect opportunity to tell the hiring manager you understand what makes this organization and job special. I like to start with:

      I am excited to apply for [job title].

      Then I launch into my explanation.

      For example:

      I am excited to apply for the Sales Analyst position. TravelClick has become a leader in the hospitality industry by always focusing on its clients—whether they’re huge global brands or local hotels. Your commitment to customer satisfaction is something I’ve always strived for in my own career. I’d love to bring this dedication, along with my relevant skills and experience, to your award-winning company.

      If you’re having trouble with this section, look through the company’s site, social media profiles, employee LinkedIn accounts, and so on to focus in on the key reasons you want this job and would be good at it. Sure, we all need a salary, but you should be able to explain why you’re enthusiastic about this opportunity in particular. (Oh, and make sure you’re describing how you can help the company, rather than how the company can help you!)

      For even more ideas, check out these 31 cover letter examples of attention-grabbing intros.

      In Your Body Paragraphs

      Your next two paragraphs should describe your most relevant previous roles, the skills you’ve learned and experiences you’ve gotten from them, and how you’d apply those skills and insight to this position. I know, that sounds a little scary, so let’s break it down.

      Format

      The first line is super simple:

      During [time period], I worked as [job title] for [company name].

      In your next couple sentences, talk about the specific responsibilities you had in that role that are the closest to the responsibilities you’d have in this job.

      As [job title], I was responsible for [Task 1, Task 2, and Task 3].

      Or:

      In this role, I worked on several projects, including [Project 1, Project 2, and Project 3].

      Now, it’s important not to regurgitate your resume here; rather, you want to take the most relevant experiences from your resume, expand on them, and describe why they’re so applicable for the job.

      It’s even more important to bring it home in your last one or two lines by discussing how you’d use what you learned from those experiences in this position.

      Here’s the whole thing:

      For the past three years, I’ve been working as a technical product manager for Blue Duck, where I’ve developed more than 30 high-level features that incorporated client requests, user needs, and design and product team capabilities with deadline and budget demands. Balancing so many needs was often challenging, and I learned how to find the solution that satisfied the maximum number of stakeholders. As your product manager, I’d apply this knowledge to ensure we delivered innovative solutions that worked for our customers and their users while staying on-time and within budget.

      Choosing Your Examples

      Wondering how you know which jobs and qualifications to highlight?

      Your current or most recent position should usually be in your cover letter (unless it was for a very short time period, or it’s not at all similar to the one you’re applying for). To find your second example, go back to the job description and highlight the three things they’re asking for that seem most important—as in, you couldn’t get hired if you didn’t have them. Maybe that’s familiarity with a niche field, or great writing abilities, or leadership talent.

      Whatever three things you highlight, make sure they’re reflected in your cover letter. Choose the job experience where you utilized those traits. And if you don’t have the exact skill they’re looking for, use the closest example you have .

      In Your Closing

      Most people use their closing paragraph to essentially say, “Thanks for reading, looking forward to hearing back.” But that’s a waste of valuable real estate! Just like the rest of your cover letter, your closing should be personalized.

      First, if you want to proactively answer a potential concern, here’s a good place to do it. Let’s say you’re currently living in Atlanta, but you want to work in Portland. End with one sentence explaining that you’re moving, such as “I am relocating to Portland in May and look forward to working in the city.” This line shows your reader you fully read the job description, and that location (or relocation) won’t be an issue.

      Perhaps you’re not quite qualified for the position. You should never say, “I know I’m not as qualified as other candidates, but…” However, you can say, “My background in [industry or profession], combined with my passion for your company and this role, would make me uniquely qualified to tackle [specific responsibility].” Ending on a strong note and highlighting why your unexpected experience is actually an asset will put the hiring manager’s mind at ease. ( More on that here .)

      Alternatively, you can use your closing to reinforce your strong interest in the job.

      For example, you could write:

      Again, TravelClick’s focus on customer service has made a huge impression on me. I would be thrilled to work at an organization where every employee—from an intern to the CEO—cares so much about the people they help.

      Thank you for your time,

      Aja Frost

      There’s no arguing that it takes longer to compose a custom cover letter for each application than just changing out the company names in a canned one. But if you care about getting the job (and I hope you do, since you’re taking the time to apply for it), personalizing each one is the way to go.

      Photo of typing courtesy of Shutterstock .

      Topics

      Templates
      ,
      Cover Letters
      ,
      Job Search
      ,
      Resumes & Cover Letters


      Career Guidance

      Aja Frost is a freelance writer specializing in business, tech, career advice, and productivity. Check out her website or say hi on Twitter .

      More from this Author

      ×

      Hmmm, seems you’ve already signed up for this class. While you’re here, you may as well check out all the amazing companies that are hiring like crazy right now.



      Back to top

      Skip to main content

      –>


      • Skip to main menu


      • Skip to user menu

      –>

      BioSpace logo

      Filter News

      • All

        (521,117)

      • Topic

        (498,626)

      • Industry

        (29,721)

      • Hotbed/Location

        (482,978)

      • Career Advice

        (3,114)

      Best Cover Letter Tips For 2015

      Published: Dec 18, 2014

      Best Cover Letter Tips For 2015

      December 18, 2014
      By Jessica Holbrook Hernandez, Expert Resume Writer

      The cover letter seems to be the document most job seekers get stumped on. They start to write one—and they’re just not quite sure what to say or how to say it. To ease the burden so many of you are feeling when you sit down to write it out, I thought I’d offer some cover letter tips from the experts.

      2015 Cover Letter Tips

      Cover Letter Tip #1: Be yourself.

      This is probably the most important tip of all. There’s so much formulaic cover letter advice that nowadays, every cover letter sounds exactly the same. That makes it even more difficult for employers to see the differences between candidates—which is one of the primary functions of your cover letter. So my advice is this… ditch the A, B, C formula and write about yourself and your interest in the position.

      Cover Letter Tip #2: Make a connection.

      When you are writing your cover letter and sharing about yourself, tell the employer why you’re interested in working for them. What do you admire about the company? Speak from your heart—in a professional way—but don’t be afraid to show a bit of your personality. This is what helps make your cover letter unique to you.

      Cover Letter Tip #3: Meet a need.

      Identify a need the company may have and share how you can help. Use examples of past successes to demonstrate or paint a visual picture for the employer of how you can help them in this same area. Again, speak in a conversational way and avoid using any templates or canned phrases.

      Cover Letter Tip #4: Avoid canned messages.

      Continuing on a bit with my last cover letter tip, I would avoid using any canned cover letter phrases and openings. For example: “please accept this… in response to…” or “I saw your advertised position of XYZ on a popular job board.” These tend to be incredibly overused. In fact, I’d venture to say 90 percent of cover letters start with one of these or a variation thereof. Buck the trend and start another way.

      Cover Letter Tip #5: Don’t bother repeating.

      Steer clear of repeating bullets from your resume. I’ve seen too many cover letters where people just pick three bullets from their resume and put them in their cover letter. Cover letters should introduce you to the employer, give them a glimpse of who you are, why you’re interested, and direct them to your resume for more information.

      Cover Letter Tip #6: Copy and paste your cover letter.

      I wrote a whole article on this one tip a few years ago, but it bears repeating now because I still see so many people who attach their cover letter to the email when applying for a position . I recommend making your cover letter the body of your email when you apply. In this case it would technically be referred to as an e-cover letter or e-note, but it will ensure it gets read. People read email. They see a cover letter attached and they may never open it and go right to the resume. But by making your cover letter the body of the email, it will be read.

      Cover Letter Tip #7: Keep it short.

      No one has the time to read your whole life story, but brevity is even more important when you’re using your cover letter as the body of your email. You want to keep it short so the reader will actually read it. If it seems too long, they’ll either scan it or avoid reading it because it’s too overwhelming.

      Cover Letter Tip #8: Close with a call.

      Encourage the employer to reach out to you via telephone or to review your social networking profile. Include both when you close your cover letter. You may even consider mentioning endorsements you have on your social networking profile so they can learn more about what your clients/past employers have to say about your work. Don’t forget to include your phone number at the end and a link to your profile URL to make it easy to access.

      Cover Letter Tip #9: Consider including a PS.

      I like to add a PS to the end of the cover letters we write. Of course, it’s not appropriate in every situation, but when you have something really compelling to say and you want to make sure it’s read, I recommend including a PS. Curiosity gets the better of people—it’s just human nature—and they will read it. So if you made an important contribution to a vital project that would benefit the employer, I recommend mentioning it.

      So that’s my list of cover letter tips for 2015. Which tip was your favorite? Didn’t see your favorite tip listed above? I’d love to hear it! Feel free to comment below and share it with me.

      About the Author

      Jessica Hernandez , is a resume authority for the Job Talk America radio program and multi-published expert author for resume, career, and job search publications. She boasts more than ten years in human resources management and hiring for Fortune 500 companies and utilizes her extensive experience to support job seekers in their quest to move onward and upward in their careers. Find out more at Great Resumes Fast .

      Check out the latest Career Insider eNewsletter – December 18, 2014 .

      Sign up for the free weekly Career Insider eNewsletter .

      • Email this

      • Facebook
      • Twitter
      • LinkedIn
      • Google+
      • Pinterest
      • Reddit

      Back to news

      –>

      –>

      ★Essay Contest

      Jump to
      Content

      Oxford Research Encyclopedias

      • Personal Profile: Sign in
      • or Create
      • About

      • Recently Published

      • Guided Tour

      • Subscriber Services

      • Help

      • Contact Us

      Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Religion

      • Browse by Subject
          

      • My Content (1)

        Recently viewed (1)

        • Martin Luther’s Treati…

      • My Searches (0)

      African Religions

      Ancient Religion

      Biblical Studies

      Biographies and Works

      Buddhism

      Christianity

      Comparative Religions

      Global Perspectives on Religion

      Hinduism

      Indigenous Religions

      Islamic Studies

      Jainism

      Judaism and Jewish Studies

      Literary and Textual Studies

      Methodology and Resources

      Mysticism and Spirituality

      Myth and Legend

      New Religions

      Religion and Art

      Religion and Politics

      Religion and Science

      Religion in America

      Rituals, Practices, and Symbolism

      Sociology, Anthropology, and Psychology of Religion

      Theology and Philosophy of Religion

      Browse All

      Close


      Martin Luther’s Treatises and Essays

       

      Mark D. Tranvik

      Subject:
      Literary and Textual Studies, Christianity, The Reformation
      Online Publication Date:
      Mar 2017
      DOI:
      10.1093/acrefore/9780199340378.013.295

      Read More

      • Print

      • Save

      • Cite

      • Email

      • Share

        Share


      Sign in

      Forgotten your password?

      Login with your Library Card »

      Login with Athens/Access Management Federation »

      Don’t have an account?

      In This Article

      Related Articles

      • Martin Luther’s Occasional Writings: Table Talk, Letters, and Prefaces
      • Martin Luther’s Writings
      • Martin Luther’s Pastoral Writings

      Show Summary Details

        Summary and Keywords

        The treatise or essay has played a key role in the transmission of ideas in the Western intellectual tradition and the Church in particular. Generally shorter than a book or monograph, the treatise attempts to examine a topic in a manner that is thorough yet avoids systematic treatment. The tone of the treatise usually avoids polemics and favors instead a more dispassionate treatment of its subject. In the middle ages, treatises in scholastic theology often became highly abstract and lifeless, focusing more on logical precision designed to appeal to the mind (intellectus). Entreaties to the heart (affectus) were often suspect because they were thought to lack intellectual rigor. Martin Luther’s “rhetoric of faith” results in a different view of the form of the treatise. Luther’s theological revolution centered on justification by grace through faith alone meant that theology was no longer aimed at only the mind. The whole person, mind and heart (intellectus and affectus), was now the proper object of instruction and persuasion. Luther stresses that faith, or pistis in the New Testament sense, involves a trust that encompasses thinking and feeling. Accordingly, Luther’s treatises and essays often exhibit this new rhetoric. The tone is often warm and embracing but certainly not to the exclusion of the mind. Evidence of this can be seen in five treatises he composes in the crucial year of 1520. This is the period just before he is excommunicated. To say the least, his future is highly uncertain. It is not surprising that he turns to the genre of the treatise as a format well suited to his program of reform. The Freedom of a Christian, The Treatise on Good Works, On the Papacy in Rome, To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation, and The Babylonian Captivity of the Church are the result. Together they comprise a radical proposal for change that envisions a Church grounded in God’s Word and sacraments from which springs forth a people freed to love and serve their neighbors in all of their callings.

        Keywords: callings , faith , freedom , genre , justification , sacraments , theology , treatise , Martin Luther


        Mark D. Tranvik

        Augsburg College

        Access to the complete content on Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Religion requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription. If you are a student or academic complete our librarian recommendation form to recommend the Oxford Research Encyclopedias to your librarians for an institutional free trial.

        Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

        If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

        For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs , and if you can’t find the answer there, please contact us .

        • Oxford University Press

        Copyright © 2018.
        All rights reserved.

        PRINTED FROM the OXFORD RESEARCH ENCYCLOPEDIA, RELIGION (religion.oxfordre.com). (c) Oxford University Press USA, 2016. All Rights Reserved. Personal use only; commercial use is strictly prohibited. Please see applicable Privacy Policy and Legal Notice (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice ).

        date: 12 October 2018

        • Cookie Policy

        • Privacy Policy

        • Legal Notice

        • Credits

        QR code

        • [212.199.61.38]
        • 212.199.61.38

        Close


        Scribd
        Upload

        638 views

        essay-freedomdemanded

        Uploaded by api-354241604

        save

        You are on page 1of 6

        Share this document

        Share or Embed Document

        Sharing Options

        • Share on Facebook, opens a new window
        • Share on Twitter, opens a new window
        • Share on LinkedIn, opens a new window
        • Share with Email, opens mail client
        • Copy Text

        Related Interests

        • Martin Luther King Jr.
        • Politics
        • Society
        • Discrimination
        • Religion And Belief

        Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

        Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

        Read Free for 30 Days

        Cancel anytime.

         

        Inagi 1Jackson InagiMs. Link/ Mr. GirbaEnglish 1H Per: 418 November !1″#rg$men%a%ive Essa&’ (ree)om *eman)e)+., billion -eo-le ”0 o %he 2orl)3s -o-$la%ion live in co$n%ries 2i%h a high or ver& high level o res%ric%ions on religion. 5his s%a%is%ic -rovi)e) b& 6rian J. Grim sho2s %ha% more %han %hree o$r%hs o %he en%ire 2orl)3s -o-$la%ion are res%ric%e) 2hen i% comes %o belies 2hich sho$l) no% an) canno% ha–en7 an) %he onl& 2a& %o -reven% %his $n$s% movemen% rom con%in$ing is %o )eman) ree)om. Man& -eo-le believe %ha% ree)om sho$l) be )eman)e)7 ho2ever man& -eo-le also believe %ha% ree)om sho$l) be given %his is a )eba%e) %o-ic as bo%h si)es %r$l& believe ho2 ree)om sho$l) be achieve). In %he %e9%s7 I Have a *ream;7 Loli%a in 5ehran;7 an) # E$log& or *r. Mar%in L$%her <ing Jr.; %he %o-ic o ree)om is highl& )eba%e) 2i%h o–osing si)es eeling %heir o-inions on ree)om are correc%. =$ch as7 blacks eeling %he& ge% ree)om o–ose) %o 2hi%es eeling %he& sho$l) no% ge% ree)om in I Have a *ream; or M$slim 2omen no% having ree)om in Islam as sho2n in Loli%a in 5ehran;. (ree)om is an im-or%an% %hing %o an& -erson7 i% is some%hing %ha% m$s% be )eman)e) %o receive. (ree)om allo2sever&one %o be )ieren% an) is some%hing %ha% each an) ever& -erson sho$l) have7 ho2ever7 no% ever&one has ree)om so %he& m$s% )eman) an) %ake i%7 ever&one also )eserves %he chance a% ree)om7 an) inall& ree)om gives -eo-le ho-e.(ree)om is some%hing so im-or%an% %o a -erson %ha% %he& m$s% %reas$re i% 2hen %he& have i%7 b$% no% ever&one has ree)om so %he& m$s% )eman) i% %o have i%. In %he %e9% I Have a *ream;7

         

        Inagi Mar%in L$%her <ing Jr. s%a%es7 6$% one h$n)re) &ears la%er7 %he Negro s%ill is no% ree> %he lie o %he Negro is s%ill sa)l& cri–le) b& %he manacles o segrega%ion an) %he chains o )iscrimina%ion>;<ing 48. <ing 2an%s %he rea)ers %o reali?e %ha% %he black man s%ill )oes no% have ree)om an) %ha% s%ill even a%er one h$n)re) &ears 2here i% 2as s$–ose) %o ge% be%%er an) [email protected]$ali%& 2as %o be sho2n7 %he black man is s%ill )iscrimina%e) agains% an) %rea%e) )ieren%l& %han o%hers. 5his @$o%e sho2s %ha% ree)om m$s% be )eman)e) beca$se black -eo-le in #merica )i) no% have ree)om an) ha) %o ob%ain i%. 5hro$gh 1!! &ears7 no negro )eman)e) ree)om an) so %he& never receive) i%7 onl& 2hen Mar%in L$%her <ing bravel& s%oo) $- or all black men an) )eman)e) ree)om7 %hen negroes co$l) begin %o ob%ain ree)om. #?ar Naisi7 in Loli%a in 5ehran;7 )isc$sses %ha% …2here &o$ng 2omen 2ho )isobe& %he r$les are h$rle) in%o -a%rol cars7%aken %o ail7 logge)7 ine)7 orce) %o go back an) )o %he same %hing;Naisi 8,. In %his )e%ail7  Naisi sho2s %he rea)ers 2ha% ha–ens %o 2omen in Iran 2hen %he& )o no% ollo2 %he la2s an) conve&s %he br$%al 2a&s in 2hich %he 2omen are -$nishe) 2hen %he& ail %o )o so. 5his @$o%e s$–or%s %ha% ree)om m$s% be )eman)e) beca$se 2omen )i) no% have %he righ% o ree)om an) s%ill have no% o$gh% back %o %r& an) ob%ain i%. 5he M$slim 2omen are s%ill %rea%e) -oorl& an) %he same %he& have al2a&s been %rea%e) beca$se %he& ail %o )eman) %he ree)om %he& )esire7 onl& b&)eman)ing %heir ree)om is an&%hing going %o change as i% has no% an) 2ill no% be given so i% m$s% be %aken. Ai%h %he %e9%$al s$–or% rom I Have a *ream; an) Loli%a in 5ehran; rea)ers come %o %he ass$m-%ion %ha% beca$se no% ever&one has ree)om %he onl& 2a& %o ge% i% is b& )eman)ing an) %aking i%.6& %he 2or)s o Go)7 ever& -erson 2as ma)e [email protected]$al an) as s$ch ever&one )eserves %he chance %o have ree)om. #?ar Naisi -oin%s o$% a )e%ail in Loli%a in 5ehran; %ha% s%a%es 5he&

         

        Inagi , -a%rol %he s%ree%s %o make s$re %ha% 2omen like =ana? 2ear %heir veils -ro-erl&7 )o no% 2ear make$-7 )o no% 2alk in -$blic 2i%h men 2ho are no% %heir a%hers7 bro%hers or h$sban)s; Naisi 8. Naisi7 in %his )e%ail7 )escribes %he role o %he Iran mili%ia an) 2ha% %he& )o %o ens$re %ha% 2omen in Iran ollo2 %he la2s. 5his )e%ail sho2s %ha% ree)om m$s% be )eman)e) beca$se M$slim 2omen are $s% as h$man as %he 2omen in %he mili%ia7 &e% %he& are %rea%e) 2orse an) )o no% ge% %he o–or%$ni%& %o ob%ain ree)om like %he 2omen in %he mili%ia. 5he M$slim 2omen )eserve %ha% o–or%$ni%& $s% as m$ch as %he mili%ia 2omen7 b$% %he& )o no% ge% %he chance7 so ins%ea) %he M$slim 2omen m$s% igh% or %heir ree)om an) )eman) i%. Even %ho$gh %he& )o no% have %he chance %o have ree)om7 %he& m$s% s%ill )eman) i% %o have i%. In # E$log& or *r. Mar%in L$%her <ing Jr.; Bober% (. <enne)& makes ano%her in%eres%ing -oin% %ha% …2ha% 2e nee)in %he Cni%e) =%a%es is no% violence or la2lessness7 b$% love an) 2is)om7 an) com-assion %o2ar) one ano%her>;<enne)& . <enne)& 2an%s %o inorm his a$)ience %ha% %he C.=. )oes no% nee) killings or %he breaking o %he la2s7 b$% %oge%herness an) love or one ano%her. 5his @$o%e s$–or%s %ha% ree)om m$s% be )eman)e) beca$se in %he C.=. i ree)om is no% )eman)e) %hen no% ever&one 2ill ge% %he chance a% ree)om an) %ha% 2ill onl& lea) %o %he violence an) la2lessness %ha% <enne)& )isc$sses. Ever& -erson in %he Cni%e) =%a%es )eserves ree)om7 b$% 2i%ho$% %he com-assion 2i%h one ano%her ree)om 2ill be %aken rom o%hers 2ho co$l) have ha) %he chance a% i%7 an) %he violence an) la2lessness %ha% <enne)& %alks abo$% 2ill come %o r$i%ion. 6o%h Loli%a in 5ehran; an) # E$log& or *r. Mar%in L$%her <ing Jr.; -rovi)e %he rea)ers 2i%h inorma%ion %ha% ever&one )eserves %he chance a% ree)om an) %ha% chance onl& come b& )eman)ing %heir ree)om.

        • Home Page
        • Literary Techniques of Martin Luther King's I Have a Dream Speech

        Literary Techniques of Martin Luther King’s I Have a Dream Speech

        1412 Words
        6 Pages

        Show More

        Introduction
        Martin Luther King, Jr., a prominent civil rights leader, delivered a powerful speech at the historic March on Washington. The speech uses several literary techniques to engage the listener. In the speech, King especially likes to use repetition and metaphor to convey his ideas. These devices are the foundation of King’s unique and effective style.

        Repetition
        In I Have a Dream King uses repetition throughout. Repetition is a good tool to use to reinforce an important idea. In Dorothy Seyler’s Read, Reason, Write, she states: ?Some repetition of key words and phrases will occur in well-written and unified essays. Some writers, though, go beyond this technique of unified writing and use repetition to produce an

        …show more content…

        I have a dream today.

        I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

        King uses the repetition of the title be the ?drum beating?. He uses these words and follows them with things that he knows that people are hoping for. He uses the word dream, because it is such a personal and deep commodity. The phrases he adds to the end of this representation are also very personal. This is so effectual because the target audience of this speech can see these visualizations become reality. This audience probably includes many parents, like King, making his reference to his children universal. Also, the familiarity of bible-type language (especially in the last paragraph of the example), draws the listener closer into his dream.

        All of the changes to the phrase ?I have a dream? are additions to the end, except the first one of the paragraph. The first sentence in this passage includes the word ?still?. This creates an energy, because it

        Related Documents

        • Dialectic Journal on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s I Have a Dream Speech

          stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice.” | This was a very good way to start off the speech. Martin Luther King Jr. starts by recalling when Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, which was the first step to Black freedom, and that what they were doing then was the next phase. |
          “This note was a promise that all men, yes, black…

          Read More
          Words: 1063 – Pages: 5

        • I Have a Dream Essay

          ————————————————-
          I Have a Dream
          From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
          This article is about the Martin Luther King Jr. speech. For other uses, see I Have a Dream (disambiguation).

          Martin Luther King, Jr. delivering “I Have a Dream” at the 1963 Washington D.C. Civil Rights March.
          | “I Have a Dream”30-second sample from “I Have a Dream” speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. |
          Problems listening to this file? See media help. |
          “I Have a Dream” is a public speech by American activist Martin Luther King, Jr.…

          Read More
          Words: 2897 – Pages: 12

        • Martin Luther King, Speech Research Essay

          Introduction- English, speech
          I have a dream was one of the most powerful and influential speeches of all time, it not only created the realisation that the Negro was not free, it persuaded that of white people to make a change for the benefit of the African Americans. The African American civil rights movement was creeping forward but two individuals created a greater atmosphere for the reinforcement of the movement, sure William Wilberforce abolished the slave trade for Britain in 1807, and that…

          Read More
          Words: 1577 – Pages: 7

        • Essay on I Have a Dream

          “I Have a Dream”
          By: Gary Wright
          On August 28 1963, 100 years after Abraham Lincoln’s famous Gettysburg address, standing on the stairs of the emancipation president’s memorial, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave the most important speech for civil rights in our nation’s history. Dr. King chose our nation’s capital as a fitting backdrop for his speech. Dr. King explains his choice of settings during the speech when he says,”In a sense we’ve come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects…

          Read More
          Words: 713 – Pages: 3

        • A Neo-Aristotelian Essay on Martin Luther King’s I Have a Dream Speech

          Clippers, and his girlfriend. In the conversation, Sterling expressed his extreme racism towards the African Americans. He specifically told his girlfriend, “You can sleep with [black people]. You can bring them in, you can do whatever you want. The little I ask you is not to promote it on that… and not to bring them to my games.” Sterling’s recorded conversation immediately invoked a series of protesting reactions from a great deal of public figures within and outside the basketball field. Five days after…

          Read More
          Words: 1427 – Pages: 6

        • Essay on Acceptance Speech – Martin Luther King

          Acceptance Speech
          Martin Luther King was an African American activist and leader who dedicated his life to fighting for equal rights for coloured people in America. Grown up in a Baptist family, Christianity held a huge fascination for Martin Luther King, which is often reflected in his speeches. In 1964, he received the Nobel Peace Prize for his achievements in the struggle for equality and independence for coloured people. When receiving the award, Martin Luther King expresses his appreciation…

          Read More
          Words: 617 – Pages: 3

        • Essay on I Have a Dream

          The Autobiography of Martin Luther King Jr.

          Martin Luther King, Jr., (January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968) was born Michael Luther King, Jr., but later had his name changed to Martin. His grandfather began the family’s long tenure as pastors of the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, serving from 1914 to 1931; his father has served from then until the present, and from 1960 until his death Martin Luther acted as co-pastor. Martin Luther attended segregated public schools in Georgia, graduating…

          Read More
          Words: 663 – Pages: 3

        • Comparing Martin Luther King’s Techniques in his Speeches and My Own

          Comparing Martin Luther King’s Techniques in his Speeches and My Own

          As with any speech, it is popular opinion that the opening sentences
          define the standard of what is to come; I feel that Martin Luther King
          and I take different approaches to this, both of which are very
          successful. In both of King’s speeches, the opening lines are
          emboldened through clever emphasis of passionate, repetitive
          imperatives: the repetition being found in the imperative itself in
          King’s “I have…

          Read More
          Words: 903 – Pages: 4

        • I Have a Dream by Martin Luther King Essay

          Commentary on Martin Luther King, Jr.: “I Have a Dream” Speech (1963)
          On August 28, 1963, nearly a quarter of million people arrived in the District of Columbia for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. In the midst of the days various events and speeches, one stood out: Martin Luther King, Jr’s speech “ I Have a Dream”. It is a political text in which he called for racial equality and an end to the discrimination. His oration eclipsed the remarks of all other speakers that day and it is…

          Read More
          Words: 1756 – Pages: 8

        • A Comparison of I Have a Dream by Martin Luther King and Victory Speech by Barack Obama

          “I Have A Dream” and “Victory Speech” are two amazingly powerful speeches delivered by two big leaders of the American nation: Martin Luther King and Barack Obama. Both of these speeches are united in the hopes of creating a better country and achieving the American dream. The two discourses are an introduction to a change or to an improvement. Although these speeches are fairly similar, their purposes and audience are different.
          To begin with, King’s speech makes reference to the American…

          Read More
          Words: 1413 – Pages: 6

        Ready To Get Started?
        • Create Flashcards

        Discover
        • Create Flashcards
        • Mobile apps

        Company
        • About
        • FAQ
        • Support

        Follow
        •   Facebook

        •   Twitter

        ©2016 Cram.com

        Legal (Updated 9/4/14) | 

        Site Map | 

        Advertise

        ★Oedipus Rex Essay Topics To Write About

        • Home Page
        • Essay about The Role of Tiresias in Oedipus the King

        Essay about The Role of Tiresias in Oedipus the King

        872 Words
        4 Pages

        Show More

        In the play Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, the minor character of Tiresias is responsible for foreshadowing Oedipus’ fate, developing the theme of blindness, and also illustrating dramatic irony. Tiresias is responsible for further developing the theme of blindness, by using his own physical blindness to reveal to Oedipus his mental blindness. Lastly, Tiresias is ultimately responsible for imposing dramatic irony because of his great knowledge of the truth of Oedipus. As a fortune teller, Tiresias is able to see the fate and destruction of Oedipus’ life. Tiresias uses his great ability to reveal to the reader the downfalls in Oedipus’ life that will soon occur because of his quest to know his fate. The character of Tiresias demonstrates the

        …show more content…

        Tiresias is a blind man who can actually see the fated outcome of Oedipus’ life. Even though Oedipus has full use of his physical vision, he is completely blind of his and his fate. Tiresias uses his own blindness to make Oedipus aware of his own mental blindness towards the truths of his life. Tiresias reveals to Oedipus that it is Oedipus’ physical sight that deters him from seeing the truths of his past. The proceeding passage illustrates the theme of blindness as revealed by Tiresias to Oedipus. “ And since you have reproached me with my blindness, I say – you have your sight, and do not see what evils are about you, nor with whom, nor in what home you are dwelling.” (Sophocles, pg 15). This quotation clearly depicts the development of the theme of blindness, as Tiresias is tell Oedipus that even though he can see physically he is blinded by his quest to know the truth of his life. Tiresias tells Oedipus that he cannot see the torment that is a part of Oedipus’ life. Tiresias reveals to the reader that to see physically does not mean that you can see mentally, as Oedipus clearly displays towards his past and his fate.
             Irony is displayed throughout Oedipus Rex and is ultimately displayed by Tiresias. Tiresias, even though completely blind physically, can see the “wretchedness” of Oedipus’ life. On the other hand, Oedipus, who has complete use of his sight, is totally blind to his

        Related Documents

        • King Lear and King Oedipus Essay

          Shakespeare’s King Lear and Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex are two classic pieces of literature that are worth studying. This essay will discuss how free will and destiny function in the two plays. First, the plays will be introduced and analyzed separately to provide a basis for contrast and comparison. Once the foundation is established, more advanced ideas will be discussed, such as the concept of evil and literal and figurative sight.
          Oedipus Rex will be discussed first. The role of destiny is…

          Read More
          Words: 1231 – Pages: 5

        • Essay about The Role of Hamartia in Oedipus the King

          The Role of Hamartia in Oedipus the King

          Literary tragedy has roots that extend two and a half millennia into the past, but throughout this history the genre’s defining characteristics have remained the same. At the very core of tragedy lies an uncertainty over the cause of the tragic predicament. The leading candidate for an explanation of this cause often comes under the name of hamartia, a Greek word that translates into “a defect in character”, “an error” or “a mistake.” However, the most…

          Read More
          Words: 1673 – Pages: 7

        • The Tragedy of “Oedipus the King” Essay

          “Oedipus the King” by Sophocles is a tragedy of a man who unknowingly kills his father and marries his mother. Aristotles’ ideas of tragedy are tragic hero, hamartia, peripeteia, anagnorisis, and catharsis these ideas well demonstrated throughout Sophocles tragic drama of “Oedipus the King”.
          Tragic hero is a character of noble stature and has greatness but is triggered by some error and causes the hero’s downfall. Oedipus is the tragic hero of “Oedipus the king”. Oedipus has a noble stature and…

          Read More
          Words: 1015 – Pages: 5

        • Essay on Sight in Oedipus the King

          Once blind, but Now he Sees:
          Sight in Oedipus the King

          Sophocles was a phenomenal writer that captivated his audience with a distinct charm still not yet duplicated by even the best of play-writers today. In Oedipus the King, a tale of dynamic proportions regarding a leader who falls from the throne of a city to the dark depths of is fate, Sophocles demonstrates great genius in that his writings require a substantial amount of intellectual involvement from his audience. (Helmbold) One of the…

          Read More
          Words: 835 – Pages: 4

        • Oedipus the King Essay

          Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex

          Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex has fascinated readers for over two millennia with its tale of a man who falls from greatness to shame. The enigmatic play leaves many questions for the reader to answer. Is this a cruel trick of the gods? Was Oedipus fated to kill his father and marry his mother? Did he act of his own free will? Like the Greeks of centuries past, we continue to ponder these perennial questions. Part of the genius of Sophocles is that he requires a great deal…

          Read More
          Words: 2156 – Pages: 9

        • The Arrogance of King Oedipus Essay

          The play “Oedipus Rex” was written by an ancient Greek playwright named Sophocles. Sophocles is known for his compelling tragedies and well-rounded characters. The protagonist of Sophocles’ play “Oedipus Rex” is an honorable man however, chooses to lead a life of arrogance and pride known as hubris. This hubris is what ultimately causes Oedipus to unknowingly cause his own tragic demise. Oedipus fulfills the prerequisites set by Aristotle for a tragic hero. The events that conspire prior to the…

          Read More
          Words: 1630 – Pages: 7

        • Oedipus the King Character Analysis Essay

          Lancaster
          ENG230
          11/25/2010
          Oedipus the King Character Analysis
          Oedipus the King had accomplished many great things during his reign of Thebes and in his life time. Oedipus found out during his reign in Thebes that the Gods who loved him also knew his devastating fate. As a young man when Oedipus answered the riddle the Sphinx he soon found his self having everything want and need. He earned his spot as the new King of Thebes, he had a great wife and lovely set of children…

          Read More
          Words: 1337 – Pages: 6

        • Essay on Tiresias from Antigone and Oedipus the King

          The purpose of the character, Tiresias, in both “Antigone” and “Oedipus the King” is to introduce new information to the audience. When the blind soothsayer makes an entrance, some truth will be revealed and the plot will take a new course. In both plays, the main characters, Creon and Oedipus are both overly confident and proud. At this time, some calamity occurs in the plot, and they seek a prophecy from the blind soothsayer. To their demise, both men challenge the foretelling, thus promoting…

          Read More
          Words: 736 – Pages: 3

        • Oedipus the King – A Greek Tragedy by Sophocles Essay

          Oedipus arrives at Thebes and finds the city under the curse of the Sphinx who will not free the city unless the riddle is answered. Oedipus solves the riddle and is rewarded and made king. Laius, former king, has been killed and Oedipus has married the widowed queen, Iokaste. Now another plague is raging and the people of Thebes have asked Oedipus to rescue them. Kreon, Iokaste’s brother returns from Apollo’s oracle with the news that Laius’s murder must be punished in order to rid the city…

          Read More
          Words: 620 – Pages: 3

        • Essay Oedipus the King

          tragic hero?
          “Oedipus the King” by Sophocles is a very good play which talks about a guy who was fated to kill his father and married his mother. Aristotle defines “tragic hero as a person of great stature and virtue who becomes aware of a mortal defect within himself.” This defect leads to great tragedy. Oedipus’s own essential nature makes him a tragic hero because his ignorance (lack of knowledge) led him to his own destruction. Also Fate plays an important role in make Oedipus a tragic hero because…

          Read More
          Words: 1622 – Pages: 7

        Ready To Get Started?
        • Create Flashcards

        Discover
        • Create Flashcards
        • Mobile apps

        Company
        • About
        • FAQ
        • Support

        Follow
        •   Facebook

        •   Twitter

        ©2016 Cram.com

        Legal (Updated 9/4/14) | 

        Site Map | 

        Advertise

        Order Now


        01

        bestessayhelp.com

        Themes of Sight and Blindness in Oedipus the King – Essay Sample

        Home /


        Essay Examples /


        Theatre /

        Themes of Sight and Blindness …

        Themes of Sight and Blindness in Oedipus the King – Essay Sample

        In Sophocles’ play,” Oedipus the King” there are contradictory situations relating to the ability to see things literally compared to having vision symbolically.  This motif repeats again and again in this story and becomes one of its central themes.  When Oedipus begins his life, his parents are told by an oracle that he will ultimately kill his father and marry his mother.  In an effort to avert this fate, his father, Laius, orders that the child be killed but when his mother, Jocasta, brings him to a mountaintop and leaves him to die, he is rescued by a shepherd.  Both parents have actual vision, but they are unenlightened because they believe that they can thwart the will of the Gods and change fate through their actions; in reality, in Greek legends again and again mortals are unable to alter the course of their fates once they are decided upon by the Gods.  Laius and Jocasta are blind to the inevitability of the oracle’s prediction, an example of having the ability to see yet lacking the vision to accept the course of their futures.

        By contrast, Teiresias, the blind prophet who made the prediction, lacks the ability to actually see, i.e., vision, but he is able to envision the future more accurately than those with eyesight.  Without the use of his eyes, he is still able to “see” Oedipus’ past as well as his destiny.  In this story, the blind man is actually the seer while those who retain their sense of sight are the blind ones who either ignore or deny what is literally in front of them.  When Oedipus is told that he is fated to kill his father and marry his mother, he believes that Polybus and Merope, the couple who rescued and raised him, are the potential victims of this prophecy so he flees, believing that in doing so he is saving the life of his father and avoiding the sin of incest with his mother.  Like his parents, who thought they could alter the will of the Gods by getting rid of their child, Oedipus lacks the vision to understand that his fate will be his fate, despite his efforts to change the future.  In the story Oedipus the King, the contradiction between being capable of vision vs.  truly being able to see arises throughout.

        After leaving his adoptive parents, while blind to the fact that they are not his real parents, Oedipus encounters Laius on the road and after the two of them engage in conflict, he kills him, his biological father although he is blind to that fact.  Hence, the blind prophet had had the vision to see this chapter of Oedipus’ fate with clarity: indeed, Oedipus had killed his own father.  Oedipus’ continues on his journey and because he is able to solve the riddle of the Sphinx, he ends up becoming the King of Thebes, while still being oblivious to the drama that has played out with Laius in his narrative.  There, he marries his widowed mother, Jocasta, fulfilling the prophecy of the blind oracle who has once again demonstrated his ability to “see” the world with a vision that has been beyond the reach of Oedipus, Laius, and Jocasta.

        When the kingdom of Thebes begins to decline, he does turns once again to the blind prophet Teiresias for help and to learn what has happened to the kingdom that has caused such deterioration.  Once again, it is the blind man who is able to see that there has been a contaminating force which has caused the downfall of Thebes, and that polluting factor is actually King Oedipus.  He could no longer deny the horrendous truth, that he had murdered his real father and married his mother, and in desperation, he blinds himself by pointing out his eyes.  The repetitive theme of having vision but being unable to see is now combined with the fate of Oedipus, who is now blind but is completely aware of the truth of his life and its horror.

         

        02

        bestessayhelp.com

        03

        bestessayhelp.com

        The road to success is easy with a little help. Let’s get
        your assignment out of the way.

        Order now

        ★Student Support

        • Forums
          Community Discussions

        • Schools
          Find Your Best Fit

        • Articles
          Expert Advice & Insights

        Log In · Sign Up

        Welcome to College Confidential!

        The leading college-bound community on the web

        Sign Up For Free

        Join for FREE ,
        and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions,
        and more.

        Also, by registering and logging in you’ll see fewer ads and pesky
        welcome messages (like this one!)

        As a CC member, you can:

        • Reply to threads, and start your own.
        • Post reviews of your campus visits.
        • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
        • Search from over 3 million scholarships.

        Quick Links

        • Forum Home
        • Latest Posts
        • Activity
        • Unanswered
        • Best Of…

        Find A College

        • College Search
        • CampusVibe

        Articles: Expert Advice

        • Admissions

        • Test Prep

        • Careers

        • More Topics

        Top Forums

        • College Search & Selection
        • College Admissions
        • What Are My Chances?
        • Financial Aid & Scholarships
        • SAT and ACT Tests & Test Preparation
        • Parents Forum
        • Colleges and Universities
        • Ivy League

        Featured Threads

        • Report: 90% of Employers Don’t Focus on College Rankings When Hiring — CCEdit_Torrey
        • Why You Shouldn’t Want An "Easy" SAT — CCEdit_Torrey
        • 10 Career Options for Sports Enthusiasts — CCEdit_Torrey
        • Can You Recycle Your "Why Do You Want to Attend This School?" Essays? — CCEdit_Torrey

        Home
        /

        College Discussion / Transfer Students / UC Transfers
        New Discussion

        Los Angeles city college


        Dudemanguy Dudemanguy


        Registered User Posts: 96 Junior Member


        edited June 2010 in UC Transfers

        Anyone go there? Is it good, bad, easy, hard? Good faculty?

        And I know someone will probably recommend that I go to smcc but that might not be an option due to me not having a car.

        Also, what are the chances of getting into a summer trigonometry class for a new student? Will I be able to get the classes I need during the fall as a new student?

        Post edited by Dudemanguy on
        0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        Replies to: Los Angeles city college

        • #1


          kernlsanders kernlsanders


          Registered User Posts: 296 Junior Member

          I’m taking a Poli Sci course there and it’s pretty hard. The teachers there are either really good or really bad, I’ve noticed.

          Keep in mind that if you go to ANY of the 9 colleges in the LACCD (LA Community College District), you can sign up for and take classes at any of them. 🙂 That’s what I’ve done for the last 2 years and I love it. For example, this spring semester, I’m taking 12 units at Pierce (3 of which are online), 3 units online @ LA City, and 3 units online @ Harbor. A lot of people don’t know that you can work the system like this, but you can!

          It’s worth checking out, especially since you don’t have a car, and there are a LOT more online offerings than people think. —-> LACCD

          (Note: SMC is NOT in the LACCD, for those who might wonder)

          And as to your other question, classes for a new student are rougher than ever. Just don’t get your hopes set on a certain schedule, be flexible, have a lot of contingency classes in mind, take the online route if you need to/can, and whatever you do, be respectful toward the teachers you’re trying to add if you have to go that route. A lot of students show up on the first day, say rudely, "Um, are you adding people?" and then they get all huffy and walk out if the teacher says no or maybe. You NEVER know what could happen- some teachers are really flexible and love a good sob story. Others add by lottery. It just depends. Be prepared for a very hectic first week.

          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #2


          peterr86 peterr86


          Registered User Posts: 756 Member

          LACC has it’s good professors and it’s bad 1/2 your class will be gone by the end of the semester on average and theres a definate lack of really motivated students compared to SMC

          however if you are dedicated the teachers there do care and work hard to help you understand material you might be confused about.

          Good thing about LACC, i’ve never had trouble rushing a class. The teachers WANT to add you and WILL add you which is really nice.

          Make sure to go to LACC for 1 semester pref this spring before starting so you can get priority registration or else you might be stuck with the bad teachers. ratemyprofessor your schedule and you should be good

          Trick to adding classes – Show up early for the class -sit in class like a normal student and only when the teacher says whois trying to add do you say anything. They only say no if you interrupt their class then ask like "can i addddd ? " they get annoyed at that but are reasonable if you do it discreetly

          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #3


          Dudemanguy Dudemanguy


          Registered User Posts: 96 Junior Member

          I want to enroll there this upcoming fall, and also thisnsummer if possible…

          Does it make any difference if I have units from another college? By the end of this semester I’ll have 26.5 units completed from irvine valley college.

          Also, does lacc have an honors program I could get into from my IRvine gpa? Maybe I could get priority registration that way.

          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #4


          peterr86 peterr86


          Registered User Posts: 756 Member

          You would need to set up an appointment with the honor person Hector Agulara i think very nice counselor and he can hook you up with the info you can make an appointment on the website.

          Having honors doesn’t grant you priority registration but it does allow you to sign up for honor courses which is basically the same course as normal but with 1-2 extra essays per class(Very easy). So you would get priority in that sense but there is not honors for every class and you need 18 units to qualify for TAP so definately see what classes you can take iirc the avaiable clases for honors is

          Calc 1+2+3 (5 units each)
          Phil/Anthro/Eng1+2/Sociology and a few other S.S iirc (3 units)

          So if your in a math heavy major ala Econ you can take calc 1+2 honors which means extra math problems and essays on math and proofs and random stuff and 3 social sciences classes or 1 social science class if you need calc 3

          But ya honors doesn’t get priority registration unless it’s for the honors section

          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #5


          Dudemanguy Dudemanguy


          Registered User Posts: 96 Junior Member

          how about EOPS? Having an EFC of 0 means i’ll eligible, but then again I couldnt get in Irvine EOPS bc they werent accepting any new ppl due to budget cuts.
          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #6


          Dudemanguy Dudemanguy


          Registered User Posts: 96 Junior Member

          @peter

          I dont think I could handle honors math classes. If I do TAP i probably wont do any honors math/science.

          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #7


          peterr86 peterr86


          Registered User Posts: 756 Member

          Do the math but take it with Professor Kendis or Mardosian or else you’re screwed with Soo /lee/ nicholacav(sp?)

          Math honor is actually one of the easier ones. With profesor Kendis he gives you extra problems to do for extra homework that are kinda fun and relates to the stuff your doing.

          Mardosian does a good job with it too although i hadn’t personally taken it with him, but i’ve heard great things

          Biggest thing about LACC is do your research and plan your schedule accordingly the teachers are hit or miss and your best bet is to do your research before hand.

          Doing all that i’ve had a great 2 years at LACC and the place has REALLY upgraded their facilities with new buildings opening up and is very nice

          Also random trivial– The NBC show Community is filmed on LACC’s campus and is a great show

          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #8


          Dudemanguy Dudemanguy


          Registered User Posts: 96 Junior Member

          Hey are there summer 2010 classes? It doesn’t mention any summer sessions in the Schedules section of their site. This is not good 🙁
          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #9


          ouimarshmallow ouimarshmallow


          Registered User Posts: 47 Junior Member

          LACC cut most of their summer classes.
          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #10


          liek0806 liek0806


          Registered User Posts: 3,316 Senior Member

          One benefit of the LA Community college District is that if you don’t have a car, they sell buss passes for the whole semester that cost about 20 bucks. You could easily ride the metro to other community colleges like LAVC which has a metro stop right in front of the school. You could benefit by this as you will have more classes to choose from. Or even LA Trade Tech.

          Generally speaking, getting a trig class during the summer is contingent on you having met the pre-req for the class and that there is a trig class offered. It is important that you submit your transcripts from your previous community college sooner than later as to not prevent you from enrolling in classes whose pre-reqs you fulfilled at your previous school.

          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #11


          Dudemanguy Dudemanguy


          Registered User Posts: 96 Junior Member

          Is June 7th a bad registration date? I’m getting really worried, all the Bio classes are already full and I was planning to do Bio for IGETC.

          Also, I went to LACC a couple days ago. It wasn’t the prettiest campus but I wasn’t expecting much, and the counselor I talked to was an a$$hole.

          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #12


          peterr86 peterr86


          Registered User Posts: 756 Member

          take my advice and take Anthro with bartlet for Igetc 1 midterm 1 final make up a majority of your grade and 50% of the test is based on essays which are actually kinda easy.

          I found the class easy got 95%+.

          Also you can rush any class at LACC i’ve never had any issue.

          Also every counselor is pretty HORRIBLE except for Hector Agulara(sp?) but something close to that. Definately schedule your counseling appointments with him. He also handles the honor program so definately look into that.

          The honors program at LACC is basically 1 extra essay in a "honors" class in a normal class. You don’t even have different classes but you sign up for classes using different numbers so you actually kinda get priority registration

          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #13


          janethedoe janethedoe


          Posts: 2,688 Senior Member

          hahahaha they use the campus for the show "Community" they have to CGI all the names on the buildings and the…P.A. system isnt real! hahaha
          and it smells like p i s s.

          i loved my experience at City. i took 12 units there one time…it was an experience….but yeah the staff is somewhat "meh"
          i have a way with people so i cant complain much about how d0uchey people are…somehow i get everything i need…

          anyways i recommend my favorite instructor there… he is in the English Department, Joe Ryan. i took him for Shakespeare I and II (English 215 and 216)…crazy old cat…but he makes you work for your grade… awesome take him if you have the chance because he will prepare you for UC level work…out of all my CCC instructors he is in my top 3.

          he taught me one very true thing…everything in life is about holes and poles even the finest literature and prettiest poem…its all about holes and poles.

          good luck at City, they have a great parking structure and library now! 🙂

          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        • #14


          Dudemanguy Dudemanguy


          Registered User Posts: 96 Junior Member

          thanks for recommending professors…..i’ll make sure to look into them.

          How important are the two letters of recommendation for Scholars????? I don’t know if I could get those; I’m the kind of kid who just hands in his work and leaves…

          0 · Reply · Share on Facebook

        This discussion has been closed.

        Quantcast

        LACC Cub Store

        skip to main content

        Navigation

        • Textbooks:
        • Buy

        My Cart
        0 items
        You are not signed in
        Sign In

        • View Cart |
        • My Account |
        • Contact Us |
        • Gift Cards

      • login

        If you already have an account, you can log in below.

        Create an account »

        hide

      • Search by Course | Buy Textbooks


        Search By Course

          Textbooks

        • Buy Textbooks
        • Merchandise

        • General Merchandise
        • General Books

          More Info

        • About Us
        • Student Resources
        • Purchase/Return Policy
        • Privacy Policy/Terms of Use

          Contact Us

        • Customer Service
        • Faculty
        • Map & Directions
        • Phone: 323-953-4000 x2142
        • [email protected]
        • Facebook
          Twitter


        © 2018 LACC Cub Store

         

        ★Science Problems Help

        Please pass the challenge to continue.

        Please make sure your browser supports JavaScript and cookies and that you are not blocking them from loading. To learn more about how Upwork uses cookies please review our Cookie Policy .

        • Login
        • Services
            • Academic Writing
            • Essay
            • Term Paper
            • Research paper
            • Coursework
            • Case Study
            • Book Review
            • Article
            • Annotated bibliography
            • Dissertation Services
            • Thesis
            • Dissertation
            • Admission Services
            • Admission / Application Essay
            • Editing Services
            • Editing and Proofreading
            • Assignments
            • Power Point Presentation
            • Multiple Choice Questions
            • Statistics project
            • Math/Physics/Сhemistry problems
            • Report writing
            • Group project
        • About Us
            • About Us
            • Home
            • About Us
            • Services
            • Blog
            • Contact Us
            • Our Process
            • Our Process
            • Why Choose Us
            • FAQ
            • Testimonials
            • Samples
        • Pricing & Discounts
            • Prices
            • Discounts
        • Samples
        • Why Us
        • Contact Us 24/7

          1.302.789.0259 | 1.888.313.7765

        order

        GETTING WRITING HELP IS SO EASY WITH US

        Choose the type, level, urgency, and length to start off.

        Science Problems Help: Physics and Math Solutions and More

        The purpose of assigning math problems is to see how students represent, analyze and solve a certain dilemma using specific methods. Math problems are designed to test and push one’s mental capabilities. The purpose of math problems assignments is to increase your analytical skills and improve your cognitive function. Along with mathematical problems, there is another assignment that can be quite challenging for students – physics problems. Those could be theoretical or experimental. Physics problems require you to explain a certain phenomenon or experimental result or investigate a proposed theory in greater details. It all seems very complicated and almost not worth the effort, especially when you are already good at sciences, and another problem just doesn’t fit into your schedule. The next logical step is to go on the Internet and search ‘science problem help services’. And that is where we come in!

        Math problems help: We find solutions to your problems instantly!

        It is not a secret that solving math problems independently requires having a set of different skills. The experts here, on our team, possess all of the needed abilities. While doing your task, we always follow the required stages of general problem-solving methods until we reach the correct conclusion. It is, of course, easier said than done, but we have all the experience and skills to make your academic life much easier! Most students face a real battle when they are dealing with math problems homework. You can be the one who drops out of that list using professional math problems help online. If you order help with math problems, you will be able to review the question, learn the specifics of the selected method and control the process to guarantee that it is done right. Do not torture yourself puzzling over the problem, simply ask for math problems assistance from professionals, and enjoy the best results!

        Help with physics problem: A move in the right direction

        Physics problem is another tricky assignment that we can solve for you with ease. When dealing with physics problems, we read each problem carefully and use expert strategies to solve the problem. We all know how hard it could be to reach correct implications with all these large and complicated formulas in your head. Don’t worry about anything! We are here to provide you with a perfectly written paper!

        There are, undoubtedly, a lot of writing companies for you to choose from, but let us assure you that we will provide you with state-of-the-art service! A little more about the perks of ordering science problem help from us:

        • Our science problem-solving experts are professionals in their respective fields so that you will get help with any subject from math and physics to chemistry;
        • We put your success above all so that you can be certain that your paper will be structured and formatted, edited and proofread properly, with every number in its place;
        • We never recycle our papers, we guarantee you a 100% unique and plagiarism-free paper;
        • Your science problems will be resolved in accordance with all the academic standards, we never take shortcuts and always deliver a full and detailed solution;
        • We have a nice student-friendly cost policy with a special first-and-second-order discount system;
        • We never disclose our clients’ information. You shouldn’t be worried about your privacy – no one will ever know that somebody helped you with science problems homework;
        • We are with you every step of the way – from the first time you click the ‘order’ button to the moment we hand you the finished paper done by all your requirements and requests.

        Even if you feel that you are stuck with your assignment, and don’t have any time or strength left to deal with it, do not despair! All you have to do is type in ‘solve science problems for me’ and stop worrying about your assignment. Our science problems help offers you an easy solution no matter how difficult it might be. Moreover, with science problems help you can be 100% sure to have correct and exact answers at any time. Are you still waiting? Cast your worries aside and enjoy highly qualified science problems assistance with no stress and great results!

        Special prices

        $11.96 /page

        order Now

        Our Customer Reviews
        • Customer #6695
          Aug 04, 2018 14:15

          “I was blessed to find your service! Thank you for the help with my annotated bibliography within such a short time.”

        • Customer #6634
          Jul 28, 2018 08:00

          “I totally spaced up and almost missed a deadline for my argumentative essay. Thankfully, your stuff helped me and took my order right away. A day later I had my essay. You’re worth your salt, that’s for sure.”

        • Customer #6588
          Jul 22, 2018 13:17

          “Can’t tell how glad I am. I had to write five pages in just 6 hours. I would never have done it myself. And I knew nobody who could help me out. Honestly, I could not believe it was possible in first place. But I did a quick search on the web and found you. You did a great job, thank you!”

        • Customer #6053
          Apr 23, 2018 17:19

          “Thank you so much!!! I was breaking my head over this math problem for days, and your people cracked it in under a day! I’ve never been more grateful to anybody. Will definitely come to you again.”

        • Customer #4112
          Jun 23, 2017 18:59

          ” I still prefer to write papers myself but I always require help with editing and formatting. I am lost with all those styles, quotes. I like researching
          and composing but I can not make it look professional. You are my scholar
          helper!”

        • Customer #3032
          Jan 30, 2017 14:00

          “Thank you!!! Last research paper you completed for me was just perfect. I could never please my tutor with papers I wrote but you helped to change it. You provide a very well written original paper.”

          DON’T MISS YOUR DISCOUNT

          ★Views &amp

          How The Other Half Lives Essay Examples

          9 total results
          What Shocked Americans in the Novel How the Other Half Lives by Jacob Riis

          1,644 words
          4 pages
          The True Grit of American Life in How the Other Half Lives by Jacob Riis

          1,461 words
          3 pages
          The Darker Side of Tenant Housing and Urban Dwellers in the Book "How the Other Half Lives" by Jacob Riis

          1,497 words
          3 pages
          Sympathy and Poor Judgement in Jacob Riis Book "How the Other Half Lives"

          266 words
          1 page
          Jacob Riis, the Danish Born Journalist and Photographer on the Issue of Immigration in the USA during the 1890s

          1,332 words
          3 pages
          A Literary Analysis of How the Other Half Lives by Jacob Riis

          1,623 words
          4 pages
          An Analysis of How the Other Half Life and the Life of Jacob Riis

          1,332 words
          3 pages
          Race and Prejudice In "How the Other Half Lives"

          1,278 words
          3 pages
          The Situation of New York Citys Immigrants Shown in How the Other Half Lives by Jacob Riis

          1,636 words
          4 pages







          The Reality of Jacob Riis' How the Other Half Lives Essay

          1105 Words
          5 Pages

          The Reality of Jacob Riis’ How the Other Half Lives

          Jacob Riis’ book How the Other Half Lives is a detailed description on the poor and the destitute in the inner realms of New York City. Riis tries to portray the living conditions through the ‘eyes’ of his camera. He sneaks up on the people flashes a picture and then tells the rest of the city how the ‘other half’ is living. As shocking as the truth was without seeing such poverty and horrible conditions with their own eyes or taking in the experience with all their senses it still seemed like a million miles away or even just a fairy tale. The reality of this book hit the people of New York right between the eyes. Riis was once ascribed the label of lower class society, but

          …show more content…

          Riis covers many aspects of the poverty that has stricken the tenement lodgers but when talking about one end of the spectrum (poor) you also need to discuss the other (rich). With out telling people how the other half of the other half lives he’s leaving out a crucial part of how people live in New York. By avoiding, that topic he’s giving the illusion that all people in New York live in such cramped housing as tenements. When in reality New York was and is presently not composed of strictly tenement housing. There was a ‘rich’ part of town where the thought of not having any money was never even contemplated. In addition, where the industrial revolution only touched higher societies on positive outcomes such as economics the industrial revolution only made it harder for the immigrants to get ahead. By this, meaning, that they worked harder, got paid little to nothing, and still had to compensate for the short comings that where being pressed against them because they were in fact immigrants.
          Although the industrial industry played a major role, in how all the tenement dwellers made their incomes Riis never discussed that issue at any great length. He focused purely on the housing and the conditions of it. One of the examples of the conditions in the book refers to how dusty and full of dirt the buildings are. On page

          Show More

          Related
          • Jacob Riis' How the Other Half Lives Essay

            1550 Words | 7 Pages

            Jacob Riis’ How the Other Half Lives

            In How the Other Half Lives, the author Jacob Riis sheds light on the darker side of tenant housing and urban dwellers. He goes to several different parts of the city of New York witnessing first hand the hardships that many immigrants faced when coming to America. His journalism and photographs of the conditions of the tenant housing helped led the way of reformation in the slums of New York. His research opened the eyes of many Americans to the darker…

            Show More

          • Essay about Jacob A. Riis – How the Other Half Lives

            1090 Words | 5 Pages

            Jacob Riis’ book How the Other Half Lives is a detailed description on the poor and the destitute in the inner realms of New York City. Riis tries to portray the living conditions through the ‘eyes’ of his camera. He sneaks up on the people flashes a picture and then tells the rest of the city how the ‘other half’ is living. As shocking as the truth was without seeing such poverty and horrible conditions with their own eyes or taking in the experience with all their senses it still seemed like…

            Show More

          • The Lives of Others Essay

            2038 Words | 9 Pages

            Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck’s film The Lives of Other’s (2005) is set in East Berlin during the socialist reign from November 1984, up until the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989. The political context plays a significance role not only in the film’s subject matter but also in its cinematography, which exploits the voyeuristic tendencies of the audience, reflecting the surveillance of the Stasi Secret Police officers. The film follows a loyal socialist and playwright, Georg Dreyman who becomes…

            Show More

          • How The Other Half Lives

            1916 Words | 8 Pages

            Well done, Jacob Riis, well done. In the book How the Other Half Lives, published in 1890, harsh criticisms and observations, along with photojournalism, of the appalling conditions of New York City tenements and their neighborhoods are examined through the eyes of Jacob Riis. As a reporter at the time for The New York Tribune, his writing and photography sparked reform and forced many people, even the likes of Theodore Roosevelt, to focus their attention on the horrendous conditions in which the…

            Show More

          • Living Out the Reality of Others?

            1478 Words | 6 Pages

            ingredients for most of today’s reality TV shows. Guess who’s watching them? Millions of young people…” (Ilisa Cohen, 14). The world is changing in many different ways and people are influenced by many different situations. Teenagers are however, easily influenced by the good, the bad, and the reality. Not only are teenagers observing from the reality around them, but reality that is shown on television and sometimes in commercials as well. Teenagers find role models in the reality shows they see on television…

            Show More

          • Urban Poverty in 18th Century America Depicted in Riis', How the Other Half Lives

            790 Words | 4 Pages

            book How the Other Half Lives, Riis offers the audience a glimpse into the unsettling and unnoticed reality of the urban poverty in America at the turn of the 19th century. Not only he revealed the dark side of the society, he also showed the urgent need for change. Riis used emotional as well as logical appeal to support his argument in favor of the need for a social reform. By combining powerful pictures and detailed annotations accounting the conditions of life in the New York, Riis made How the…

            Show More

          • How the Film, To Live, Exposed the Realities of Communist China

            896 Words | 4 Pages

            To Live unfolds chronologically the sad story of the Xu family through four decade-divided timeframes – from the 1930s Sino-Japanese war, followed by the civil war between the communists and the nationalists, the founding of the people’s republic of China, the Great Leap Forward movement, to the late 1970s post-Cultural Revolution era. It starts with the prodigal son, Xu Fugui, who was indulged in gambling and lost all the family’s properties at stake. Fugui’s father died of anger and his mother…

            Show More

          • The Lives of Others Essay

            1486 Words | 6 Pages

            ‘Das Leben der Anderen’ (The Lives of Others) is a striking example of how a director can convey narrative links within a film by employing various styles and film techniques. The Lives of Others relies upon these visual means to assist with the telling of the story as much as it relies upon the script. In this selected sequence of the film, several narrative links are drawn here to form the conclusion of ‘Operation Lazlo’. These narrative links are further cemented by Donnersmarck’s use of various…

            Show More

          • How the Other Half Lives Essay

            1326 Words | 6 Pages

            17, 2005
            Book Report #2
            How the Other Half Lives
            Introduction
            The book How the Other Half lives, is one of those books that definitely affects you as soon as you read it. Jacob Riis the author of the book, wrote it exactly for the purpose, to affect people and get them to realize how bad the conditions were back then in New York City. He goes into full depth, of what the living conditions were like, who lived in them, and how they were affected by them. Mostly how each ethnic group lived in…

            Show More

          • How to Live with Each Other

            1209 Words | 5 Pages

            using violence as a justification for violence, just an excuse. In Richard Wright’s 1940 novel Native Son, Bigger tests Malcolm X’s words when he murders a drunken Mary Dalton out of sheer fear that people would think he took advantage of her. On the other side of the racial spectrum, Heidi Durrow’s novel The Girl Who Fell From the Sky follows a young girl growing up in the 1980s and her struggles with everyday, more subtle racism; racism that departs from the more radical movements earlier in the century…

            Show More

          More about The Reality of Jacob Riis' How the Other Half Lives Essay

          • Jacob Riis’ How the Other Half Lives Essay

            1550 Words | 7 Pages

          • Essay about Jacob A. Riis – How the Other Half Lives

            1090 Words | 5 Pages

          • The Lives of Others Essay

            2038 Words | 9 Pages

          • How The Other Half Lives

            1916 Words | 8 Pages

          • Living Out the Reality of Others?

            1478 Words | 6 Pages

          • Urban Poverty in 18th Century America Depicted in Riis’, How the Other Half Lives

            790 Words | 4 Pages

          • How the Film, To Live, Exposed the Realities of Communist China

            896 Words | 4 Pages

          • The Lives of Others Essay

            1486 Words | 6 Pages

          • How the Other Half Lives Essay

            1326 Words | 6 Pages

          • How to Live with Each Other

            1209 Words | 5 Pages

          + Popular Essays

          • Essay about The Qumran Documents (Dead Sea Scrolls)
          • Essay about The Loss of My Uncle
          • The Lady's Dressing Room and A Modest Proposal Essay
          • The Spiritual Decline of Shakespeare's Macbeth Essay
          • Comparing Edna of Kate Chopin's The Awakening and Nora of Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House
          • Audio Engineer Essay

          Open Document

          The Reality of Jacob Riis' How the Other Half Lives Essay

          1105 Words
          5 Pages

          The Reality of Jacob Riis’ How the Other Half Lives

          Jacob Riis’ book How the Other Half Lives is a detailed description on the poor and the destitute in the inner realms of New York City. Riis tries to portray the living conditions through the ‘eyes’ of his camera. He sneaks up on the people flashes a picture and then tells the rest of the city how the ‘other half’ is living. As shocking as the truth was without seeing such poverty and horrible conditions with their own eyes or taking in the experience with all their senses it still seemed like a million miles away or even just a fairy tale. The reality of this book hit the people of New York right between the eyes. Riis was once ascribed the label of lower class society, but

          …show more content…

          Riis covers many aspects of the poverty that has stricken the tenement lodgers but when talking about one end of the spectrum (poor) you also need to discuss the other (rich). With out telling people how the other half of the other half lives he’s leaving out a crucial part of how people live in New York. By avoiding, that topic he’s giving the illusion that all people in New York live in such cramped housing as tenements. When in reality New York was and is presently not composed of strictly tenement housing. There was a ‘rich’ part of town where the thought of not having any money was never even contemplated. In addition, where the industrial revolution only touched higher societies on positive outcomes such as economics the industrial revolution only made it harder for the immigrants to get ahead. By this, meaning, that they worked harder, got paid little to nothing, and still had to compensate for the short comings that where being pressed against them because they were in fact immigrants.
          Although the industrial industry played a major role, in how all the tenement dwellers made their incomes Riis never discussed that issue at any great length. He focused purely on the housing and the conditions of it. One of the examples of the conditions in the book refers to how dusty and full of dirt the buildings are. On page

          Show More

          Related
          • Jacob Riis' How the Other Half Lives Essay

            1550 Words | 7 Pages

            Jacob Riis’ How the Other Half Lives

            In How the Other Half Lives, the author Jacob Riis sheds light on the darker side of tenant housing and urban dwellers. He goes to several different parts of the city of New York witnessing first hand the hardships that many immigrants faced when coming to America. His journalism and photographs of the conditions of the tenant housing helped led the way of reformation in the slums of New York. His research opened the eyes of many Americans to the darker…

            Show More

          • Essay about Jacob A. Riis – How the Other Half Lives

            1090 Words | 5 Pages

            Jacob Riis’ book How the Other Half Lives is a detailed description on the poor and the destitute in the inner realms of New York City. Riis tries to portray the living conditions through the ‘eyes’ of his camera. He sneaks up on the people flashes a picture and then tells the rest of the city how the ‘other half’ is living. As shocking as the truth was without seeing such poverty and horrible conditions with their own eyes or taking in the experience with all their senses it still seemed like…

            Show More

          • The Lives of Others Essay

            2038 Words | 9 Pages

            Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck’s film The Lives of Other’s (2005) is set in East Berlin during the socialist reign from November 1984, up until the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989. The political context plays a significance role not only in the film’s subject matter but also in its cinematography, which exploits the voyeuristic tendencies of the audience, reflecting the surveillance of the Stasi Secret Police officers. The film follows a loyal socialist and playwright, Georg Dreyman who becomes…

            Show More

          • How The Other Half Lives

            1916 Words | 8 Pages

            Well done, Jacob Riis, well done. In the book How the Other Half Lives, published in 1890, harsh criticisms and observations, along with photojournalism, of the appalling conditions of New York City tenements and their neighborhoods are examined through the eyes of Jacob Riis. As a reporter at the time for The New York Tribune, his writing and photography sparked reform and forced many people, even the likes of Theodore Roosevelt, to focus their attention on the horrendous conditions in which the…

            Show More

          • Living Out the Reality of Others?

            1478 Words | 6 Pages

            ingredients for most of today’s reality TV shows. Guess who’s watching them? Millions of young people…” (Ilisa Cohen, 14). The world is changing in many different ways and people are influenced by many different situations. Teenagers are however, easily influenced by the good, the bad, and the reality. Not only are teenagers observing from the reality around them, but reality that is shown on television and sometimes in commercials as well. Teenagers find role models in the reality shows they see on television…

            Show More

          • Urban Poverty in 18th Century America Depicted in Riis', How the Other Half Lives

            790 Words | 4 Pages

            book How the Other Half Lives, Riis offers the audience a glimpse into the unsettling and unnoticed reality of the urban poverty in America at the turn of the 19th century. Not only he revealed the dark side of the society, he also showed the urgent need for change. Riis used emotional as well as logical appeal to support his argument in favor of the need for a social reform. By combining powerful pictures and detailed annotations accounting the conditions of life in the New York, Riis made How the…

            Show More

          • How the Film, To Live, Exposed the Realities of Communist China

            896 Words | 4 Pages

            To Live unfolds chronologically the sad story of the Xu family through four decade-divided timeframes – from the 1930s Sino-Japanese war, followed by the civil war between the communists and the nationalists, the founding of the people’s republic of China, the Great Leap Forward movement, to the late 1970s post-Cultural Revolution era. It starts with the prodigal son, Xu Fugui, who was indulged in gambling and lost all the family’s properties at stake. Fugui’s father died of anger and his mother…

            Show More

          • The Lives of Others Essay

            1486 Words | 6 Pages

            ‘Das Leben der Anderen’ (The Lives of Others) is a striking example of how a director can convey narrative links within a film by employing various styles and film techniques. The Lives of Others relies upon these visual means to assist with the telling of the story as much as it relies upon the script. In this selected sequence of the film, several narrative links are drawn here to form the conclusion of ‘Operation Lazlo’. These narrative links are further cemented by Donnersmarck’s use of various…

            Show More

          • How the Other Half Lives Essay

            1326 Words | 6 Pages

            17, 2005
            Book Report #2
            How the Other Half Lives
            Introduction
            The book How the Other Half lives, is one of those books that definitely affects you as soon as you read it. Jacob Riis the author of the book, wrote it exactly for the purpose, to affect people and get them to realize how bad the conditions were back then in New York City. He goes into full depth, of what the living conditions were like, who lived in them, and how they were affected by them. Mostly how each ethnic group lived in…

            Show More

          • How to Live with Each Other

            1209 Words | 5 Pages

            using violence as a justification for violence, just an excuse. In Richard Wright’s 1940 novel Native Son, Bigger tests Malcolm X’s words when he murders a drunken Mary Dalton out of sheer fear that people would think he took advantage of her. On the other side of the racial spectrum, Heidi Durrow’s novel The Girl Who Fell From the Sky follows a young girl growing up in the 1980s and her struggles with everyday, more subtle racism; racism that departs from the more radical movements earlier in the century…

            Show More

          More about The Reality of Jacob Riis' How the Other Half Lives Essay

          • Jacob Riis’ How the Other Half Lives Essay

            1550 Words | 7 Pages

          • Essay about Jacob A. Riis – How the Other Half Lives

            1090 Words | 5 Pages

          • The Lives of Others Essay

            2038 Words | 9 Pages

          • How The Other Half Lives

            1916 Words | 8 Pages

          • Living Out the Reality of Others?

            1478 Words | 6 Pages

          • Urban Poverty in 18th Century America Depicted in Riis’, How the Other Half Lives

            790 Words | 4 Pages

          • How the Film, To Live, Exposed the Realities of Communist China

            896 Words | 4 Pages

          • The Lives of Others Essay

            1486 Words | 6 Pages

          • How the Other Half Lives Essay

            1326 Words | 6 Pages

          • How to Live with Each Other

            1209 Words | 5 Pages

          + Popular Essays

          • Essay about The Qumran Documents (Dead Sea Scrolls)
          • Essay about The Loss of My Uncle
          • The Lady's Dressing Room and A Modest Proposal Essay
          • The Spiritual Decline of Shakespeare's Macbeth Essay
          • Comparing Edna of Kate Chopin's The Awakening and Nora of Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House
          • Audio Engineer Essay

          Open Document

          ★How to Write an Argumentative Essay on any Topic

          Page semi-protected

          Essay

          From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

          Jump to navigation
          Jump to search

          This article needs additional citations for verification . Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources . Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2017) ( Learn how and when to remove this template message )

          For other uses, see Essay (disambiguation) .
          For a description of essays as used by Wikipedia editors, see Wikipedia:Essays .
          “Essai” redirects here. For other uses, see Essai (disambiguation) .

          Essays of Michel de Montaigne

          An essay is, generally, a piece of writing that gives the author’s own argument — but the definition is vague, overlapping with those of a paper , an article , a pamphlet , and a short story . Essays have traditionally been sub-classified as formal and informal. Formal essays are characterized by “serious purpose, dignity, logical organization, length,” whereas the informal essay is characterized by “the personal element (self-revelation, individual tastes and experiences, confidential manner), humor, graceful style, rambling structure, unconventionality or novelty of theme,” etc. [1]

          Essays are commonly used as literary criticism , political manifestos , learned arguments , observations of daily life, recollections, and reflections of the author. Almost all modern essays are written in prose , but works in verse have been dubbed essays (e.g., Alexander Pope ‘s An Essay on Criticism and An Essay on Man ). While brevity usually defines an essay, voluminous works like John Locke ‘s An Essay Concerning Human Understanding and Thomas Malthus ‘s An Essay on the Principle of Population are counterexamples.

          In some countries (e.g., the United States and Canada), essays have become a major part of formal education . Secondary students are taught structured essay formats to improve their writing skills; admission essays are often used by universities in selecting applicants, and in the humanities and social sciences essays are often used as a way of assessing the performance of students during final exams.

          The concept of an “essay” has been extended to other media beyond writing. A film essay is a movie that often incorporates documentary filmmaking styles and focuses more on the evolution of a theme or idea. A photographic essay covers a topic with a linked series of photographs that may have accompanying text or captions .

          Contents

          • 1 Definitions
          • 2 History
            • 2.1 Europe
            • 2.2 Japan
          • 3 Forms and styles
            • 3.1 Cause and effect
            • 3.2 Classification and division
            • 3.3 Compare and contrast
            • 3.4 Descriptive
            • 3.5 Dialectic
            • 3.6 Exemplification
            • 3.7 Familiar
            • 3.8 History (thesis)
            • 3.9 Narrative
            • 3.10 Argumentative
            • 3.11 Economic
            • 3.12 Reflective
            • 3.13 Other logical structures
          • 4 Academic
          • 5 Magazine or newspaper
          • 6 Employment
          • 7 Non-literary types
            • 7.1 Film
            • 7.2 Music
            • 7.3 Photography
            • 7.4 Visual arts
          • 8 See also
          • 9 References
          • 10 Further reading
          • 11 External links

          Definitions

          John Locke ‘s 1690 An Essay Concerning Human Understanding .

          An essay has been defined in a variety of ways. One definition is a “prose composition with a focused subject of discussion” or a “long, systematic discourse”. [2]
          It is difficult to define the genre into which essays fall. Aldous Huxley , a leading essayist, gives guidance on the subject. [3] He notes that “the essay is a literary device for saying almost everything about almost anything”, and adds that “by tradition, almost by definition, the essay is a short piece”. Furthermore, Huxley argues that “essays belong to a literary species whose extreme variability can be studied most effectively within a three-poled frame of reference”.
          These three poles (or worlds in which the essay may exist) are:

          • The personal and the autobiographical: The essayists that feel most comfortable in this pole “write fragments of reflective autobiography and look at the world through the keyhole of anecdote and description”.
          • The objective, the factual, and the concrete particular: The essayists that write from this pole “do not speak directly of themselves, but turn their attention outward to some literary or scientific or political theme. Their art consists of setting forth, passing judgment upon, and drawing general conclusions from the relevant data”.
          • The abstract-universal: In this pole “we find those essayists who do their work in the world of high abstractions”, who are never personal and who seldom mention the particular facts of experience.

          Huxley adds that the most satisfying essays “…make the best not of one, not of two, but of all the three worlds in which it is possible for the essay to exist.”

          The word essay derives from the French infinitive essayer, “to try” or “to attempt”. In English essay first meant “a trial” or “an attempt”, and this is still an alternative meaning. The Frenchman Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592) was the first author to describe his work as essays; he used the term to characterize these as “attempts” to put his thoughts into writing, and his essays grew out of his commonplacing . [4] Inspired in particular by the works of Plutarch , a translation of whose Œuvres Morales (Moral works) into French had just been published by Jacques Amyot , Montaigne began to compose his essays in 1572; the first edition, entitled Essais , was published in two volumes in 1580. For the rest of his life, he continued revising previously published essays and composing new ones. Francis Bacon ‘s essays , published in book form in 1597, 1612, and 1625, were the first works in English that described themselves as essays. Ben Jonson first used the word essayist in English in 1609, according to the Oxford English Dictionary .

          History

          Globe icon.
          The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view of the subject. You may improve this article , discuss the issue on the talk page , or create a new article , as appropriate. (January 2011) ( Learn how and when to remove this template message )

          Europe

          English essayists included Robert Burton (1577–1641) and Sir Thomas Browne (1605–1682). In France, Michel de Montaigne ‘s three volume Essais in the mid 1500s contain over 100 examples widely regarded as the predecessor of the modern essay. In Italy, Baldassare Castiglione wrote about courtly manners in his essay Il Cortigiano. In the 17th century, the Jesuit Baltasar Gracián wrote about the theme of wisdom. [5] During the Age of Enlightenment , essays were a favored tool of polemicists who aimed at convincing readers of their position; they also featured heavily in the rise of periodical literature , as seen in the works of Joseph Addison , Richard Steele and Samuel Johnson . In the 18th and 19th centuries, Edmund Burke and Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote essays for the general public. The early 19th century, in particular, saw a proliferation of great essayists in English – William Hazlitt , Charles Lamb , Leigh Hunt and Thomas de Quincey all penned numerous essays on diverse subjects. In the 20th century, a number of essayists tried to explain the new movements in art and culture by using essays (e.g., T.S. Eliot ). Whereas some essayists used essays for strident political themes, Robert Louis Stevenson and Willa Cather wrote lighter essays. Virginia Woolf , Edmund Wilson , and Charles du Bos wrote literary criticism essays. [5]

          Japan

          Main article: Zuihitsu

          As with the novel , essays existed in Japan several centuries before they developed in Europe with a genre of essays known as zuihitsu — loosely connected essays and fragmented ideas. Zuihitsu have existed since almost the beginnings of Japanese literature. Many of the most noted early works of Japanese literature are in this genre. Notable examples include The Pillow Book (c. 1000), by court lady Sei Shōnagon , and Tsurezuregusa (1330), by particularly renowned Japanese Buddhist monk Yoshida Kenkō . Kenkō described his short writings similarly to Montaigne, referring to them as “nonsensical thoughts” written in “idle hours”. Another noteworthy difference from Europe is that women have traditionally written in Japan, though the more formal, Chinese-influenced writings of male writers were more prized at the time.

          Forms and styles

          This section describes the different forms and styles of essay writing. These forms and styles are used by an array of authors, including university students and professional essayists .

          Cause and effect

          The defining features of a “cause and effect” essay are causal chains that connect from a cause to an effect, careful language, and chronological or emphatic order. A writer using this rhetorical method must consider the subject , determine the purpose , consider the audience , think critically about different causes or consequences, consider a thesis statement, arrange the parts, consider the language , and decide on a conclusion. [6]

          Classification and division

          Classification is the categorization of objects into a larger whole while division is the breaking of a larger whole into smaller parts. [7]

          Compare and contrast

          Compare and contrast essays are characterized by a basis for comparison, points of comparison, and analogies. It is grouped by the object (chunking) or by point (sequential). The comparison highlights the similarities between two or more similar objects while contrasting highlights the differences between two or more objects. When writing a compare/contrast essay, writers need to determine their purpose, consider their audience, consider the basis and points of comparison, consider their thesis statement, arrange and develop the comparison, and reach a conclusion. Compare and contrast is arranged emphatically. [8]

          Descriptive

          Descriptive writing is characterized by sensory details, which appeal to the physical senses, and details that appeal to a reader’s emotional, physical, or intellectual sensibilities. Determining the purpose, considering the audience, creating a dominant impression, using descriptive language, and organizing the description are the rhetorical choices to consider when using a description. A description is usually arranged spatially but can also be chronological or emphatic. The focus of a description is the scene. Description uses tools such as denotative language, connotative language, figurative language , metaphor , and simile to arrive at a dominant impression. [9] One university essay guide states that “descriptive writing says what happened or what another author has discussed; it provides an account of the topic”. [10]
          Lyric essays are an important form of descriptive essays.

          Dialectic

          In the dialectic form of the essay, which is commonly used in philosophy , the writer makes a thesis and argument, then objects to their own argument (with a counterargument), but then counters the counterargument with a final and novel argument. This form benefits from presenting a broader perspective while countering a possible flaw that some may present. This type is sometimes called an ethics paper. [11]

          Exemplification

          An exemplification essay is characterized by a generalization and relevant, representative, and believable examples including anecdotes . Writers need to consider their subject, determine their purpose, consider their audience, decide on specific examples, and arrange all the parts together when writing an exemplification essay. [12]

          Malthus’ Essay on the Principle of Population

          Familiar

          An essayist writes a familiar essay if speaking to a single reader, writing about both themselves, and about particular subjects. Anne Fadiman notes that “the genre’s heyday was the early nineteenth century,” and that its greatest exponent was Charles Lamb . [13] She also suggests that while critical essays have more brain than the heart, and personal essays have more heart than brain, familiar essays have equal measures of both. [14]

          History (thesis)

          A history essay sometimes referred to as a thesis essay describes an argument or claim about one or more historical events and supports that claim with evidence, arguments, and references. The text makes it clear to the reader why the argument or claim is as such. [15]

          Narrative

          A narrative uses tools such as flashbacks , flash-forwards , and transitions that often build to a climax. The focus of a narrative is the plot . When creating a narrative, authors must determine their purpose, consider their audience, establish their point of view, use dialogue, and organize the narrative. A narrative is usually arranged chronologically. [16]

          Argumentative

          An argumentative essay is a critical piece of writing, aimed at presenting objective analysis of the subject matter, narrowed down to a single topic. The main idea of all the criticism is to provide an opinion either of positive or negative implication. As such, a critical essay requires research and analysis, strong internal logic and sharp structure. Its structure normally builds around introduction with a topic’s relevance and a thesis statement , body paragraphs with arguments linking back to the main thesis, and conclusion. In addition, an argumentative essay may include a refutation section where conflicting ideas are acknowledged, described, and criticized. Each argument of argumentative essay should be supported with sufficient evidence, relevant to the point.

          Economic

          An economic essay can start with a thesis, or it can start with a theme. It can take a narrative course and a descriptive course. It can even become an argumentative essay if the author feels the need. After the introduction, the author has to do his/her best to expose the economic matter at hand, to analyze it, evaluate it, and draw a conclusion. If the essay takes more of a narrative form then the author has to expose each aspect of the economic puzzle in a way that makes it clear and understandable for the reader

          Reflective

          A reflective essay is an analytical piece of writing in which the writer describes a real or imaginary scene, event, interaction, passing thought, memory, or form — adding a personal reflection on the meaning of the topic in the author’s life. Thus, the focus is not merely descriptive. The writer doesn’t just describe the situation, but revisits the scene with more detail and emotion to examine what went well, or reveal a need for additional learning — and may relate what transpired to the rest of the author’s life.

          Other logical structures

          The logical progression and organizational structure of an essay can take many forms. Understanding how the movement of thought is managed through an essay has a profound impact on its overall cogency and ability to impress. A number of alternative logical structures for essays have been visualized as diagrams, making them easy to implement or adapt in the construction of an argument. [17]

          Academic

          University students , like these students doing research at a university library, are often assigned essays as a way to get them to analyze what they have read.

          Main article: Free response

          In countries like the United States and the United Kingdom , essays have become a major part of a formal education in the form of free response questions. Secondary students in these countries are taught structured essay formats to improve their writing skills, and essays are often used by universities in these countries in selecting applicants (see admissions essay ). In both secondary and tertiary education, essays are used to judge the mastery and comprehension of the material. Students are asked to explain, comment on, or assess a topic of study in the form of an essay. In some courses, university students must complete one or more essays over several weeks or months. In addition, in fields such as the humanities and social sciences,[ citation needed ] mid-term and end of term examinations often require students to write a short essay in two or three hours.

          In these countries, so-called academic essays also called papers, are usually more formal than literary ones.[ citation needed ] They may still allow the presentation of the writer’s own views, but this is done in a logical and factual manner, with the use of the first person often discouraged. Longer academic essays (often with a word limit of between 2,000 and 5,000 words)[ citation needed ] are often more discursive. They sometimes begin with a short summary analysis of what has previously been written on a topic, which is often called a literature review .[ citation needed ]

          Longer essays may also contain an introductory page that defines words and phrases of the essay’s topic. Most academic institutions require that all substantial facts, quotations, and other supporting material in an essay be referenced in a bibliography or works cited page at the end of the text. This scholarly convention helps others (whether teachers or fellow scholars) to understand the basis of facts and quotations the author uses to support the essay’s argument and helps readers evaluate to what extent the argument is supported by evidence, and to evaluate the quality of that evidence. The academic essay tests the student’s ability to present their thoughts in an organized way and is designed to test their intellectual capabilities.

          One of the challenges facing universities is that in some cases, students may submit essays purchased from an essay mill (or “paper mill”) as their own work. An “essay mill” is a ghostwriting service that sells pre-written essays to university and college students. Since plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty or academic fraud , universities and colleges may investigate papers they suspect are from an essay mill by using plagiarism detection software, which compares essays against a database of known mill essays and by orally testing students on the contents of their papers. [18]

          Magazine or newspaper

          Main article: Long-form journalism

          Essays often appear in magazines, especially magazines with an intellectual bent, such as The Atlantic and Harpers . Magazine and newspaper essays use many of the essay types described in the section on forms and styles (e.g., descriptive essays, narrative essays, etc.). Some newspapers also print essays in the op-ed section.

          An 1895 cover of Harpers , a US magazine that prints a number of essays per issue.

          Employment

          Employment essays detailing experience in a certain occupational field are required when applying for some jobs, especially government jobs in the United States. Essays known as Knowledge Skills and Executive Core Qualifications are required when applying to certain US federal government positions.

          A KSA, or “Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities,” is a series of narrative statements that are required when applying to Federal government job openings in the United States. KSAs are used along with resumes to determine who the best applicants are when several candidates qualify for a job. The knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for the successful performance of a position are contained on each job vacancy announcement. KSAs are brief and focused essays about one’s career and educational background that presumably qualify one to perform the duties of the position being applied for.

          An Executive Core Qualification, or ECQ, is a narrative statement that is required when applying to Senior Executive Service positions within the US Federal government. Like the KSAs, ECQs are used along with resumes to determine who the best applicants are when several candidates qualify for a job. The Office of Personnel Management has established five executive core qualifications that all applicants seeking to enter the Senior Executive Service must demonstrate.

          Non-literary types

          Film

          A film essay (or “cinematic essay”) consists of the evolution of a theme or an idea rather than a plot per se, or the film literally being a cinematic accompaniment to a narrator reading an essay.[ citation needed ] From another perspective, an essay film could be defined as a documentary film visual basis combined with a form of commentary that contains elements of self-portrait (rather than autobiography), where the signature (rather than the life story) of the filmmaker is apparent. The cinematic essay often blends documentary , fiction , and experimental film making using tones and editing styles. [19]

          The genre is not well-defined but might include propaganda works of early Soviet parliamentarians like Dziga Vertov , present-day filmmakers including Chris Marker , [20] Michael Moore ( Roger & Me (1989), Bowling for Columbine (2002) and Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004)), Errol Morris ( The Thin Blue Line (1988)), Morgan Spurlock ( Supersize Me: A Film of Epic Portions ) and Agnès Varda . Jean-Luc Godard describes his recent work as “film-essays”. [21] Two filmmakers whose work was the antecedent to the cinematic essay include Georges Méliès and Bertolt Brecht . Méliès made a short film ( The Coronation of Edward VII (1902)) about the 1902 coronation of King Edward VII , which mixes actual footage with shots of a recreation of the event. Brecht was a playwright who experimented with film and incorporated film projections into some of his plays. [19] Orson Welles made an essay film in his own pioneering style, released in 1974, called F for Fake , which dealt specifically with art forger Elmyr de Hory and with the themes of deception, “fakery,” and authenticity in general. These are often published online on video hosting services . [22] [23]

          David Winks Gray’s article “The essay film in action” states that the “essay film became an identifiable form of filmmaking in the 1950s and ’60s”. He states that since that time, essay films have tended to be “on the margins” of the filmmaking the world. Essay films have a “peculiar searching, questioning tone … between documentary and fiction” but without “fitting comfortably” into either genre. Gray notes that just like written essays, essay films “tend to marry the personal voice of a guiding narrator (often the director) with a wide swath of other voices”. [24] The University of Wisconsin Cinematheque website echoes some of Gray’s comments; it calls a film essay an “intimate and allusive” genre that “catches filmmakers in a pensive mood, ruminating on the margins between fiction and documentary” in a manner that is “refreshingly inventive, playful, and idiosyncratic”. [25]

          Music

          In the realm of music , composer Samuel Barber wrote a set of “Essays for Orchestra,” relying on the form and content of the music to guide the listener’s ear, rather than any extra-musical plot or story .

          Photography

          “After School Play Interrupted by the Catch and Release of a Stingray” is a simple time-sequence photo essay .

          A photographic essay strives to cover a topic with a linked series of photographs . Photo essays range from purely photographic works to photographs with captions or small notes to full-text essays with a few or many accompanying photographs. Photo essays can be sequential in nature, intended to be viewed in a particular order — or they may consist of non-ordered photographs viewed all at once or in an order that the viewer chooses. All photo essays are collections of photographs, but not all collections of photographs are photo essays. Photo essays often address a certain issue or attempt to capture the character of places and events.

          Visual arts

          In the visual arts , an essay is a preliminary drawing or sketch that forms a basis for a final painting or sculpture, made as a test of the work’s composition (this meaning of the term, like several of those following, comes from the word essayJA’s meaning of “attempt” or “trial”).

          See also

          • Abstract (summary)
          • Admissions essay
          • Body (writing)
          • Book report
          • Thesis
          • Essay thesis
          • Five paragraph essay
          • Introduction
          • List of essayists
          • Plagiarism
          • SAT Essay
          • Schaffer paragraph
          • Treatise
          • Writing

          References

          1. ^ Holman, William (2003). A Handbook to Literature (9 ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall. p. 193.

          2. ^ Gale – Free Resources – Glossary – DE Archived 2010-04-25 at the Wayback Machine .. Gale.cengage.com. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
          3. ^ Aldous Huxley, Collected Essays, “Preface”.
          4. ^ “Book Use Book Theory: 1500–1700: Commonplace Thinking” . Lib.uchicago.edu. Archived from the original on 2013-08-01. Retrieved 2013-08-10.
          5. ^ a b essay (literature) – Britannica Online Encyclopedia Archived 2009-12-04 at the Wayback Machine .. Britannica.com. Retrieved March 22, 2011.
          6. ^ Chapter 7: Cause and Effect in Glenn, Cheryl. Making Sense: A Real-World Rhetorical Reader. Ed. Denise B. Wydra, et al. Second ed. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2005.
          7. ^ Chapter 5: Classification and Division in Glenn, Cheryl. Making Sense: A Real-World Rhetorical Reader. Ed. Denise B. Wydra, et al. Second ed. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2005.
          8. ^ Chapter 6: Comparison and Contrast in Glenn, Cheryl. Making Sense: A Real-World Rhetorical Reader. Ed. Denise B. Wydra, et al. Second ed. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2005.
          9. ^ Chapter 2: Description in Glenn, Cheryl. Making Sense: A Real-World Rhetorical Reader. Ed. Denise B. Wydra, et al. Second ed. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2005.
          10. ^ Section 2.1 of the Simon Fraser University CNS Essay Handbook. Available online at: sfu.ca
          11. ^ “How to Write an Ethics Paper (with Pictures) – wikiHow” . Archived from the original on 2016-08-28. Retrieved 2016-07-01.
          12. ^ Chapter 4: Exemplification in Glenn, Cheryl. Making Sense: A Real-World Rhetorical Reader. Ed. Denise B. Wydra, et al. Second ed. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2005.
          13. ^ Fadiman, Anne . At Large and At Small: Familiar Essays. p. x.
          14. ^ Fadiman, At Large and At Small, xi.
          15. ^ History Essay Format & Thesis Statement, (February 2010)
          16. ^ Chapter 3 Narration in Glenn, Cheryl. Making Sense: A Real-World Rhetorical Reader. Ed. Denise B. Wydra, et al. Second ed. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2005.
          17. ^ Mission Possible’ by Dr. Mario Petrucci” (PDF). Archived from the original on 2014-10-26. Retrieved 2014-10-25.
          18. ^ Khomami, Nadia (20 February 2017). “Plan to crack down on websites selling essays to students announced” . The Guardian. Archived from the original on 27 April 2017.
          19. ^ a b Cinematic Essay Film Genre Archived 2007-08-08 at the Wayback Machine .. chicagomediaworks.com. Retrieved March 22, 2011.
          20. ^ ( registration required ) Lim, Dennis (July 31, 2012). “Chris Marker, 91, Pioneer of the Essay Film” Archived 2012-08-03 at the Wayback Machine .. The New York Times . Retrieved July 31, 2012.
          21. ^ Discussion of film essays Archived 2007-08-08 at the Wayback Machine .. Chicago Media Works.
          22. ^ Kaye, Jeremy (2016-01-17). “5 filmmakers that have mastered the art of the Video Essay” . Medium. Archived from the original on 2017-08-30. Retrieved 2017-07-05.
          23. ^ Liptak, Andrew (2016-08-01). “This filmmaker deep-dives into what makes your favorite cartoons tick” . The Verge. Archived from the original on 2017-08-30. Retrieved 2017-07-05.
          24. ^ Gray, David Winks (January 30, 2009). “The essay film in action” . San Francisco Film Society . Archived from the original on March 15, 2009.
          25. ^ “Talking Pictures: The Art of the Essay Film” . Cinema.wisc.edu. Retrieved March 22, 2011.

          Further reading

          • Theodor W. Adorno , “The Essay as Form” in: Theodor W. Adorno, The Adorno Reader, Blackwell Publishers 2000.
          • Beaujour, Michel. Miroirs d’encre: Rhétorique de l’autoportrait’. Paris: Seuil, 1980. [Poetics of the Literary Self-Portrait. Trans. Yara Milos. New York: NYU Press, 1991].
          • Bensmaïa, Reda. The Barthes Effect: The Essay as Reflective Text. Trans. Pat Fedkiew. Minneapolis: Univ. of Minnesota Press, 1987.
          • D’Agata, John (Editor), The Lost Origins of the Essay. St Paul: Graywolf Press, 2009.
          • Giamatti, Louis. “The Cinematic Essay”, in Godard and the Others: Essays in Cinematic Form. London, Tantivy Press, 1975.
          • Lopate, Phillip. “In Search of the Centaur: The Essay-Film”, in Beyond Document: Essays on Nonfiction Film. Edited by Charles Warren, Wesleyan University Press, 1998. pp. 243–270.
          • Warburton, Nigel . The basics of essay writing. Routledge, 2006. ISBN   0-415-24000-X , ISBN   978-0-415-24000-0

          External links

          This article’s use of external links may not follow Wikipedia’s policies or guidelines. Please improve this article by removing excessive or inappropriate external links, and converting useful links where appropriate into footnote references . (February 2015) ( Learn how and when to remove this template message )
          Wikibooks has a book on the topic of: How to write an essay
          Wikimedia Commons has media related to Essays .
          • Essay writing category on EnglishGrammar.org
          • What is an Essay? from Wikidot
          • Essay eTexts at Project Gutenberg
          • The Dialectical Essay: A detailed writing guide  – Sewanee University
          • In Praise of the Undergraduate Essay by Dan Edelstein, Stanford University
          • The Age of the Essay  – Criticism of the modern essay, by Paul Graham
          Authority control Edit this at Wikidata
          • GND : 4015553-5
          • LCCN : sh85044914
          • NDL : 00562043

          Retrieved from ” https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Essay&oldid=851746628 ”
          Categories :

          • Essays
          • School terminology
          • Writing
          Hidden categories:

          • Webarchive template wayback links
          • Pages with login required references or sources
          • Articles needing additional references from October 2017
          • All articles needing additional references
          • Wikipedia indefinitely semi-protected pages
          • Articles with limited geographic scope from January 2011
          • All articles with unsourced statements
          • Articles with unsourced statements from August 2010
          • Articles with unsourced statements from July 2015
          • Wikipedia external links cleanup from February 2015
          • Wikipedia spam cleanup from February 2015
          • Wikipedia articles with GND identifiers
          • Wikipedia articles with LCCN identifiers
          • Wikipedia articles with NDL identifiers

          Navigation menu

          Personal tools

          • Not logged in
          • Talk
          • Contributions
          • Create account
          • Log in

          Namespaces

          • Article
          • Talk

          Variants

            Views

            • Read
            • View source
            • View history

            More


              Navigation

              • Main page
              • Contents
              • Featured content
              • Current events
              • Random article
              • Donate to Wikipedia
              • Wikipedia store

              Interaction

              • Help
              • About Wikipedia
              • Community portal
              • Recent changes
              • Contact page

              Tools

              • What links here
              • Related changes
              • Upload file
              • Special pages
              • Permanent link
              • Page information
              • Wikidata item
              • Cite this page

              Print/export

              • Create a book
              • Download as PDF
              • Printable version

              In other projects

              • Wikimedia Commons

              Languages

              • Afrikaans
              • Alemannisch
              • العربية
              • Asturianu
              • Azərbaycanca
              • تۆرکجه
              • বাংলা
              • Беларуская
              • Беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎
              • Български
              • Boarisch
              • Bosanski
              • Català
              • Чӑвашла
              • Čeština
              • Cymraeg
              • Dansk
              • Deutsch
              • Eesti
              • Ελληνικά
              • Español
              • Esperanto
              • Euskara
              • فارسی
              • Føroyskt
              • Français
              • Frysk
              • Gàidhlig
              • Galego
              • 한국어
              • Հայերեն
              • हिन्दी
              • Hrvatski
              • Ido
              • বিষ্ণুপ্রিয়া মণিপুরী
              • Bahasa Indonesia
              • Interlingua
              • Italiano
              • עברית
              • Basa Jawa
              • ქართული
              • Қазақша
              • Kurdî
              • Кыргызча
              • Latina
              • Latviešu
              • Lietuvių
              • Magyar
              • Македонски
              • മലയാളം
              • मराठी
              • Bahasa Melayu
              • မြန်မာဘာသာ
              • Nederlands
              • नेपाली
              • 日本語
              • Norsk
              • Norsk nynorsk
              • Oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча
              • Polski
              • Português
              • Română
              • Русиньскый
              • Русский
              • Shqip
              • සිංහල
              • Simple English
              • سنڌي
              • Slovenčina
              • Slovenščina
              • Српски / srpski
              • Srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски
              • Suomi
              • Svenska
              • Tagalog
              • தமிழ்
              • ไทย
              • Тоҷикӣ
              • Türkçe
              • Українська
              • Vèneto
              • Tiếng Việt
              • Walon
              • 中文
              Edit links

              • This page was last edited on 24 July 2018, at 10:04 (UTC).
              • Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License ;
                additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy . Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. , a non-profit organization.
              • Privacy policy
              • About Wikipedia
              • Disclaimers
              • Contact Wikipedia
              • Developers
              • Cookie statement
              • Mobile view
              • Wikimedia Foundation
              • Powered by MediaWiki

              ★Essay on Violence As A Social Problem

              Questia: Trusted online research

              Home » Browse »
              Criminal Justice » Social and Psychological Aspects of Crime » Violence

              Violence

              Topics

              • Violence
              • Abused Men
              • Aggression
              • Aggression in Children
              • Battered Woman Syndrome
              • Battered Women
              • Child Abuse
              • Child Abuse Prevention
              • Columbine Shootings
              • Concealed Carry of Firearms
              • Dating Violence
              • Domestic Violence
              • Domestic Violence Prevention
              • Ethnic Cleansing
              • Ethnic Conflict
              • Gangs
              • Gun Control
              • Gun Violence
              • Hate Crimes
              • Los Angeles Riots (1992)
              • Political Violence
              • Psychology of Violence
              • Riots and Rioters
              • School Violence
              • Teenagers and Dating Violence
              • Video Game Violence and Children
              • Violence Against Women Act
              • Violence in Literature
              • Violence in the Media
              • Workplace Violence
              • Youth Gangs
              • Youth Violence
              Looking for a topic idea? Use Questia’s Topic Generator

              Log out

              Upgrade your membership

              Log in

              Buy instant access

              Oops!

              An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.

              Reload

              We use cookies to deliver a better user experience and to show you ads based on your interests. By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our Privacy Policy

              ★Peer pressure essays


              Object Moved

              This document may be found here

              Saved Essays
              • Save your essays here so you can locate them quickly!
              Topics in Paper
              • Adolescence
              • Hayes
              • Peer To Peer
              • Peer Pressure
              • Want
              • Dobson
              • Kaplan
              • Need
              • Political Spectrum
              @Example Essays

                Peer Pressure



                2 Pages
                612 Words

                             Peer pressure is a very real issue that affects many of the teenagers of the world today. Society offers many misleading advertisements that seem to lead teens in all the wrong directions. If the youth of today are more educated, the future of our world will be a lot better off (Dobson).
                            
                There are all sorts of pressures that children face today,. Drinking, smoking, staying out past curfew, having sex when you are not ready- whatever it may be, sometimes others put the pressure on you to participate in something you might not want to do (Hayes).
                            
                Peer pressure is stress of strain you feel from friends and school mates to act, behave, think and look a certain way. This kind of pressure can cover everything from fashion through sex and dating (Goldsmith). If you are very worried about peer pressure it is important to find someone who you can talk to.
                            
                Teens today face numerous tensions that can have an impact on the decisions they make. Sometimes these decisions are negative ones, including using drugs or alcohol, sex, violence or just a desire to fit in (Lingren). Although peer pressure can be extremely strong and hard to resist, there are ways to fight it. Studies have shown how peer pressure
                            
                alone can change one's mind from what they know is right to making the wrong decision. Also, it has been said that all it takes for someone to stand their ground on what they know is right is for one other peer to agree with them.
                            
                Inner strength and self-confidence can help you stand firm, walk away, and resist doing something when you know better. Paying attention to your own feelings and beliefs about what is right and wrong can help you to know the right thing to do (Kids Health). If you continually face peer pressure and you are finding it difficult to handle, talk to someone you trust.
                            
                There are positive kinds of peer pressure and it can be powerful in shaping positive behaviors in teens. Peers can
                            

                Continue reading this essay
                Continue reading

                Page 1 of 2

                Next Page

                More Essays:


                APA    
                MLA    
                Chicago

                Peer Pressure. (1969, December 31). In MegaEssays.com. Retrieved 09:44, October 12, 2018, from https://www.megaessays.com/viewpaper/86101.html
                MegaEssays. “Peer Pressure.” MegaEssays.com. MegaEssays.com, (December 31, 1969). Web. 12 Oct. 2018.
                MegaEssays, “Peer Pressure.,” MegaEssays.com, https://www.megaessays.com/viewpaper/86101.html (accessed October 12, 2018)

                • Fair Use Policy
                • Help Centre
                • Loading…
                • Sign In

                UKEssays logo

                UKEssays
                Trusted by students since 2003
                0115 966 7955
                Today’s Opening Times 10:00 – 20:00 (BST)

                Place an Order

                Instant price

                Struggling with your work?

                Get it right the first time & learn smarter today

                Place an Order

                Banner ad for Viper plagiarism checker

                Peer Pressure And How It Affects Behaviour Philosophy Essay

                Print

                Reference this

                Disclaimer: This work has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional academic writers. You can view samples of our professional work here .

                Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of UK Essays.

                Published: Mon, 5 Dec 2016

                What is social influence? Social influence is the change in behaviour that one person causes in another, intentionally or unintentionally, as a result of the way the changed person perceives themselves in relationship to the influencer, other people and society in general.

                Types of social influence on behaviour are a very interesting and an important topic in social psychology. It goes on to show us that even though individuals might consider themselves to possess qualities of uniqueness, when studied, their behavioural patterns are not very different from other individuals.

                The purpose for this study is to determine if social influence is bad or not. The two types of social influence that will be discussed are conformity and obedience. Conformity is the tendency to change one’s behaviours or beliefs to match others. Why do people change because of social influence? Social psychologists provide two main reasons for the effects of social influence which are normative social and informational social influence ( Deutsch  Gerard, 1995 ). Obedience is obeying an order from someone that you accept as an authority figure. Obedience can be constructive and destructive. How social influence can affect people’s behaviour will be discussed in this study.

                .

                Conformity

                Peer Pressure and how it affects behaviour

                Peer pressure is an example of normative social influence. This form of influence stems from our need to be liked by others. That is why we will follow certain behavioural patterns in order to conform to others’ expectations. Depending on how influential or popular a person or group is and how important their approval is for one, they will follow suit just so that they are liked by them.

                Teenagers especially face many issues related to conformity and peer pressure. They are pulled between the desire to be seen as individuals of unique value and the desire to belong to a group where they feel secure and accepted. As a result, teenagers reject family or general society values, while feeling pressure to conform rigidly to the values of their peer group. For example, this can be seen when young people join gangs. By joining the gang they are rejecting the community’s way of dressing and behaving. They have to conform to the gang’s own style of dress, behaviour, and speech. They must follow what the other gang members are doing. Sometimes, they are involved in all kinds of negative activities such as smoking, drinking, taking drugs and so on.

                Peer pressure by itself is neither positive nor negative. For example, both high and low academic achievements are closely linked to peer influences. Several studies say that the values of the peer group with whom the high school student spends the most time are a stronger factor in the student’s level of academic success than the values, attitudes, and support provided by the family. Some students who spent time with an academically oriented peer group got better grades despite the fact that their families were not so supportive.

                People get influenced easily when they join gangs. They start drinking, smoking, taking drugs and doing all kinds of negative activities. For them, it is fun doing such things because they are in a gang. They influence one another to do bad things.

                Peer pressure also influences the degree to which children conform to expected gender roles. For example, girls get better grades in science and mathematics compared to boys up to grade six, but during adolescence girls test scores and level of expressed interest in these two subjects tend to decline. The tendency is to abandon competition with boys in favour of placing more emphasis on relationships and on physical appearance.

                In expressed peer pressure, a boy may be challenged by the group to prove his manhood by having sex or performing a risky stunt such as car racing. On the other hand, girls may be told that if they want to be part of a group they must do something illegal such as taking drugs. Studies show that both girls and boy take risks they do not want to take because they believe the risky behaviour will increase their standing in the eyes of their peers, make them more popular and assure their acceptance in the group. They can feel safe and secure in the group. Implied peer pressure is more subtle and can be harder to combat. For example, a group of boys may make fun of the way another boy is dressed, pressuring members of their group to dress only in one acceptable style. Because of this, people who look, dress, act in a different way or have different interests from those of their age group become outcasts. Pressure groups place on their members not to associate with anyone unlike themselves. This can lead the rejected person to feel desperate and depressed.

                However peer pressure isn’t all bad. You and your friends can pressure each other into some things that will improve your health and social life and make you feel good about your decisions. Think of a time when a friend pushed you to do something good for yourself or to avoid something that would’ve been bad. There are some good things friends can pressure each other to do such as be honest, avoid alcohol, avoid drugs, not smoke, and respect others.

                One good example is group studies. In a group study, friends are able to encourage one another to study well. They are able to help one another by discussing difficult topics, solving problems and also understanding a particular topic well by actually interacting with one another. These are all the good sides of peer pressure. These types of behaviours are influential. One can be influenced but in a good way. One is influenced to do good things rather than doing bad things.

                Peer pressure provides individuals with a yard stick for self evaluation, leading individuals to being more competent. Interaction among peer groups who exchange different viewpoints for example political, religious or educational can promote moral development and independence in personal expression.

                Internet and how it affects behaviour

                Informational influence is a form of conformity which occurs when an individual turns to another in order to obtain information. It occurs when the person does not know what to do and turns to another person or other sources of information and believes the information from this person or source is true. This particular phenomenon takes on specific qualities on the Internet. On the Internet there is nobody standing in front of the room speaking or guiding the group. Nonetheless informational influence certainly occurs.   

                A cue used in forums, which can be dedicated to any subject ranging from music to international politics, is the ‘post counter’. To know how many times they have written a post, a small number under the user’s screen name will be able to indicate it. Ranking sytems can be found in some forums. As they become more involved in the community and continue making new posts, they will be ranked as experts. So, people tend to get influenced and think that the contributions written by users with the most posts and has a higher ranking are more valid than those of new users. Users often believe in information provided by these individuals rather than others.

                The information stored in the Internet is portrayed and interpreted in a different way than by exposure through meetings in person. The influence physical appearance such as clothing has on the perception of authority is a different social psychological phenomenon, yet it is an important factor in informational influence. There are many different things that can be done by the web designer to improve the visual aspects of the site, which replaces the physical appearance of the individual. This is done since people are not able to see how an individual behind a website appears. This in turn gives the impression that the information on the website is more credible and reliable. A well designed website can be particularly effective if it organizes and portrays information in a particular way.

                Older individuals or those who have limited experience with computers are easily influenced. The mere fact that the Internet is text based is also a form of informational influence in itself. People often feel that information conveyed through text is more reliable than information passed through word of mouth.

                The influence of the Internet has caused an impact on the way we communicate, learn and even shop. Through the Internet, all kinds of information can be easily spread. The introduction of mail service has changed the way people connect to others in their social world. Mail made possible connections among people without physical proximity.

                On the one hand, since the main use of the Internet is for communication, some people might speculate that the Internet will have positive social consequences in people’s everyday lives because it increases the frequency and quality of interpersonal communications among people. People with easy access to others would feel better connected and more strongly supported by others, leading to happiness and engagement in families, organizations, communities, and society more generally. People are able to communicate more easily.

                The Internet also allows people to work more easily from their home, to search for any information that they need, to form and sustain friendships and even romantic attachments from their home, to vote and engage in political and social issue based discussions with others.

                Some people are able to maintain long distance relationships through the Internet. For example, people are able to communicate through social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, Skype and so on. In this variety of ways, Internet communications can potentially displace face-to-face communications. According to some psychologists, social media networks such as Facebook and Twitter demonstrate that group polarization can occur even when a group is not physically together.

                Blindly trusting information that they find online can be bad. As we know, not all information that is online can be reliable. There are many fake websites that are created by web designers in order to influence people and they also have all kinds of schemes that can trick people of their money. Besides, information that we get through forum websites on the Internet are sometimes not reliable and not true. Some users tend to simply post information out of nowhere and that brings no meaning at all. So, people that are searching for information on a certain topic for example would belief such posts and think that it’s true. They will think that the information on that website is true and reliable when it actually is not that reliable.

                Besides, social networks can influence people in a bad way. For example, Facebook. Mark Zuckerberg started the website with the intention of helping students to get to know each other better. As we can see nowadays, people are so addicted to Facebook. Children that spend more time on the Internet tend to develop anxiety, more stomach aches and more sick days from school. Besides, as we can see students that spend most of their time with the Internet, like using Facebook get lower grades in their exams. Facebook’s applications can be really addicting. Facebook is giving people the chance to turn to another person to obtain information. We can even form our own group and invite others to join it. There is even an ‘anti group’ group. As we can see, Facebook is actually influencing people to create and join such groups that can bring harm to themselves and the society. (James M.Henslin, Third Edition,2009 ,Pearson International Edition, Sociology )

                Obedience

                Obedience to authority and how it affects behaviour

                An example is the classroom authority. Teachers use a different set of techniques for fostering obedience than they do for facilitating personal responsibility. Most obedience techniques rely on punishment and reward. Teachers try to demonstrate consistency in applying these positive and negative consequences to maintain a safe and orderly classroom.

                Students are to honour their teacher. This goes beyond obedience. It means to hold high or to give a special place of respect. Obedience will be the result of such honour, but obedience can be performed without honour.

                This is a simple situation where obedience to authority can be seen. Primary 2 students for example were told to memorize their times table and they were told that their task was to help another subject like themselves learn the times table (in pairs). Each time one made a mistake, they would be punished together by the teacher. For example, standing in midfield or running around the field. They would then be given a second chance by which if they made a mistake a second time the punishment would be more severe.

                Besides, there are some teachers that use positive reinforcement to get their students to obey them. For example, a teacher rewards his or her student with a chocolate when he or she memorises the times table correctly. Positive reinforcement always works better on a child than punishment for negative behaviour or disobedience. From this, we can say that students will definitely obey the teacher and memorise the times table properly in order to avoid the punishment.

                A social psychologist, Philip Zimbardo carried out the Stanford Prison experiment (1971) showing a fine example of perception of authority to social roles. Zimbardo selected volunteers and randomly assigned them to either a prison guard or a prisoner role to observe their interaction. Zimbardo believed that the behaviour in prisons could be best explained using a situational attribution. In particular he believed that the conditions were influenced by the social roles that prisoners and prisoner guards are expected to play. Not even Zimbardo foresaw how the study would turn out. Students were then selected from a response to an advertisement in a newspaper asking for volunteers to participate in a psychological study into prison life. Guards were told about their duties and the prisoners were arrested and blindfolded. This experiment was carried out at The Stanford University Psychology Department. The experiment was supposed to be for 2 weeks. Unfortunately, it only lasted for about 6 days due to the situation becoming all too realistic. They became engulfed by role that they were acting out. The guards became abusive to the point where they would humiliate and push the prisoners around. The prisoners were depressed and some were even released few days after the experiment had begun. Zimbardo’s study shows that the roles we play as members of a group can have a powerful effect on behaviour. ( Taylor S.E , Peplau L.A, Sears D.O ( Social Psychology, twelfth edition ) )

                The question whether obedience is good or bad arises. Our society raises us to believe that obedience is good and disobedience is bad. We are taught to obey others and to be disobedient is something that is not good. Society tells us this, but it is not really true. Obedience is required for our society to function, yet, because of the power of authority, individuals may obey in ways which are destructive and against their personal, moral values. Most people will even be obedient to the point of causing harm to others, because to be disobedient requires the courage to be alone against authority. In Stanley Milgram’s “Perils of Obedience” experiment, his studies showed that sixty percent of ordinary people would agree to obey an authority figure even to the point of severely hurting another human being. Zimbardo’s prison guards were abusing their power and controlling the prisoners. This shows that those in higher positions tend to influence others immorally. In this experiment, the prisoners became traumatized, depressed and dehumanized. Zimbardo’s prison experiment is a form of destructive obedience. The trauma inflicted being large or small seems to be unnecessary or avoidable and arguably unethical. Zimbardo failed to question the morality of what was going on and what the prisoners were going through. Was he showing any regard as to the well being of the participants? He had become a participant rather than the observer to his work.

                Being disobedient is not always wrong. As we can see in Hebrew mythology, human history began because of an act of disobedience. Adam and Eve gained independence from nature by disobeying God and eating an apple. Man’s development has largely been affected by being disobedient to authority. It’s as though we are allowing society to imprison us by accepting the roles assigned to us. Obedience is a behaviour deeply ingrained in us. It can be seen as an impulse that overrides ethics and sympathy. The tendency to locate the source of behaviour disorders in a particular person or group underestimates the power of situational forces. Constructive obedience benefits society. Without obedience to authority, society could not function.

                Constructive obedience is building upon obedience in a positive way. It uses positive reinforcement to get results using positive psychological methods. For example the teacher rewards the student for good behaviour and does not punish them for bad behaviour. Destructive obedience is when we obey blindly. We obey to do things that will harm us or others.

                We tend to obey easily because when we are obedient to an authority, we tend to feel safe and protected. We can’t make mistakes because the authority decides for us and we can’t be alone, because the authority watches over us. No matter what our behaviour is, it can be justified on the ground that we are only following orders, doing what we’re told from above. We can easily be brought to view ourselves as an instrument for carrying out another person’s wishes, and so we no longer feel responsible for our actions. Unfortunately, that can make us feel responsible to the authority, instead of the content of the orders the authority is giving. The focus is changed although there is still morality there.

                However, this does not necessarily mean that all disobedience is good and all obedience is bad. That would ignore the relationship between obedience and disobedience. Acts of obedience to one principle is usually and act of disobedience to another. If a man can only obey, then therefore he is a slave and will accomplish very little. But, if a man can only disobey, he is a rebel and does not act in the name of a conviction or principle.

                We have to obey authority otherwise there would be chaos. This scenario would be far worse as you wouldn’t be as safe and many of your basic rights could easily be violated. There have been people throughout history who have challenged authority to great effect. This occurs because the people in authority issue ‘laws and rules’ that are unfair. Simple rule is, we obey to society’s rules because they normally benefit us.

                Conclusion

                Is social influence bad? Well, as we have discussed, social influence has its pros and cons. Therefore, social influence can be good and it can be bad. As for peer pressure, the difference between good peer pressure and bad peer pressure is often summed up with a simple comparison. When it is good, you are a member of the crowd and when it is bad, you are part of a mob. If peer pressure is telling you to act in a generally appropriate way, to do the right thing when you may not otherwise, or to do more good than harm, experts say it is safe to say this is good. As long as following the crowd does not cause one to act without consideration, following is not always a bad thing to do. In a situation where peer pressure is good, individuals in the groups would be acting as individual parts of a whole, each working with the other.

                We have also discussed about the Internet and how it influences behaviour. Well again, it has its pros and cons. It can be a bad influence but at the same time it can be a good influence too. It all depends on the individual himself. If you look at it as something good and beneficial, then yes it would be beneficial to you and it would influence you in a good way but if you chose to use it in the wrong way then it can be a bad influence on your behaviour. For example, like Facebook. If you chose to use Facebook for communication purpose or as a faster way for exchanging information with someone else, then it could be a good thing. But if you use it for the wrong reasons, then you could be influenced to do things that are not so good and that could leave a bad impact on your behaviour and others.

                Regarding obedience, if our minds are so quick to obey an authority, we should channel our obedience towards our knowledge. Transform morals into authority, make decisions and carry out actions which affect our society in a positive and effective way. If we can accomplish this, our morals, values and critical discourse will determine our contribution to society. The danger comes when we blindly obey such figures and as a result behave in an immoral way as a result. Again, obedience has its pros and cons.

                Therefore, we conclude that social influence can be good and can be bad.


                Cite This Work

                To export a reference to this article please select a referencing stye below:

                • APA
                • MLA
                • MLA-7
                • Harvard
                • Vancouver
                • Wikipedia
                • OSCOLA


                Reference Copied to Clipboard.


                Reference Copied to Clipboard.


                Reference Copied to Clipboard.


                Reference Copied to Clipboard.


                Reference Copied to Clipboard.


                Reference Copied to Clipboard.


                Reference Copied to Clipboard.

                Request Removal

                If you are the original writer of this essay and no longer wish to have the essay published on the UK Essays website then please click on the link below to request removal:


                More from UK Essays

                Philosophy Essay Writing Service
                Free Essays
                More Philosophy Essays
                Examples of Our Work
                Philosophy Dissertation Examples